Posts Tagged ‘Jewish Mysticism’

11
Jul

Rabbi David Lapin of I-Awaken on Pinchas: What Are You willing To Sacrifice?

by admin in Spiritual Growth

The opening passage of the Parsha holds the key to understanding courage. Zimri desecrated G-d’s name by publicly flaunting his illicit relationship with the Midianite Princess, Kozbi bat Tzor. Pinchas reacts passionately and in accordance with the Halachah of that time, assassinates Zimri and kills Kozbi. Hashem responds by rewarding Pinchas with an everlasting Brit Shalom (Covenant of Peace) manifesting in the hereditary rights of Kehuna. From now on Pinchas and his male descendants would be Kohanim. Rashi and others ask if Pinchas was already a Kohen, the grandson of Aharon the Kohen Gadol, what was new in this “gift” of Kehuna that G-d now gave him? Rashi answers that Kehuna had only been given to Aharon and to Aharon’s sons (and their descendants) who were anointed at that time with Aharon. But since Pinchas was already born but was not anointed, he in fact did not become a Kohen until this moment.The Zohar however says that a Kohen who murders, loses his status and rights of Kehuna. The Sefat Emet[1] points out accordingly that Pinchas had lost his Kehuna when he killed Zimri, and G-d returned it to him as a reward for his intervention in the Zimri affair. Pinchas sacrificed his life (Zimri would have been fully entitled to kill Pinchas in self defense – that was a risk Pinchas took) and his Kehuna. He had no idea that Hashem would return it to him; he assumed it would be lost forever. He was willing to lose his Kehuna to do what was right. His reward lay exactly in the things he sacrificed: He was given eternal life (Pinchas is Eliyahu Hanavi who never died), and he and his descendants are given back the Kehuna they lost.

The fear of loss precludes courage: Herein lies the foundation of courage: So long as people fear loss they will lack courage. We have courage when we are willing to surrender our attachments to everything except our own souls. People who are inextricably attached to their physical lives, will not risk their lives for anything. People who are attached to relationships in ways they could never sever, will never risk them. People attached to power, will compromise their values to retain their power, and people attached to material belongings will never act in ways that could risk the loss of those belongings. The capacity to detach is the condition for courage. The idea in Mussar that best expresses detachment, is Perishut.

Detachment does not mean disengagement: Perishut does not mean disengagement, it means surrendering dependency. A person can be deeply engaged in a relationship, but not be attached to it in a needy or addictive manner. While the relationship exists he or she is fully committed to it and engaged in it. But should the need arise to take a stand on a matter of principle bigger even than the relationship itself, they will not hesitate to put that cause before the relationship. That is courage. The military hero, who has left a loving family at home as he goes into battle to protect his land and his nation, will sacrifice his relationship if that is what is needed for the safety of his land. That does not mean that he does not love his family, nor that he is not entirely committed to them. It simply means he is not attached to them in a way that would make it impossible for him to detach if need be, to do what is right.People who risk their status and influence to make a moral stand, have courage. People who sacrifice their popularity to talk the truth, have courage. People who sacrifice their wealth for the education of their children or to go on Aliyah, have courage. People who fight or whose children fight on our behalf in the Israeli army have courage: they risk, and sometimes sadly give, their lives for us. That does not mean that those people do not value their status, popularity, wealth or children’s lives. It just means they are not inextricably attached to those things, and if absolutely necessary would sacrifice them for a higher purpose.

The reward for sacrifice

The outcome of acting with courage is so interesting and counter-intuitive. We learn from the story of Pinchas that courageous people gain exactly what they sacrificed, but in a higher dimension. People that sacrifice status for a higher purpose, ultimately gain honor: sometimes honor in the eyes of others, sometimes they experience that honor only in their own eyes. The wealth gained from educated children exceeds the wealth of the money invested in that education. Even heroic soldiers who die al Kiddush Hashem (for the sanctification of G-d’s name[2]) and their parents who have sacrificed their sons, achieve an eternity in this world and the next to which no one else can aspire.

Growth manifests in diminishing attachments

As we evolve spiritually, increasing our connection with our own Ruchniut (spirituality), we decrease our dependence on all other attachments. It is a little like a child who grows out of his intense attachment to his childhood toys as he grows older. If we are as attached now to the same things we were some years ago, we have failed to grow. Ultimately, as we loosen our attachments (but not our engagement) with more and more of the things around us, we prepare ourselves for the ultimate evolution. An evolution to a state of detachment from everything we knew except our souls and Hashem. If we die before we detach, the pain of separation is severe.

The Three Weeks and Tisha Be’Av

Sometimes we detach from the things we are meant never to be detached from. Sometimes we feel detached from our own souls, sometimes even from Hashem. Many people wonder why they do not genuinely feel pain and sorrow during the Three Weeks or even on Tisha Be’Av. It is because they are detached from the idea of the Beit Hamikdash, and so do not feel its loss. That is misplaced courage! During these weeks we try to gain a deeper feeling of the glamour and majesty of life with the Temple and the tragedy of Jewish life without it. Then we feel the loss. Then we experience the pain.This is a time to experience loss for more than the Beit Hamikdash. During these hard Three Weeks we are all too aware of the millions of courageous people who sacrificed their lives for Hashem, the Torah and the Jewish people. Some had no choice but others willingly chose to sacrifice their lives rather than lose their souls. They are the heroes of this period. They valued their lives but were not so attached to life that they could not sacrifice it for something bigger: the eternity of the Torah and the Jewish people. Those men and women, like Pinchas, teach us courage.

Notes:

[1] Pinchas, 5641

[2] The Torah allows us to risk our lives (even for G-d) only in vary rare circumstances. In the case of military activity we may only do so only to defend our religion, our people or our land when their survival is threatened. This is a very opposite philosophy from that which drives the actions of Islamic Fundamentalist extremists.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with
Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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31
May

The Great Escape

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Spiritual Growth

I love Michio Kaku’s books, but I have a problem with his Physics of the Impossible: He discusses phasers, force fields, teleportation and time travel, but he does not even mention the invention for which I am most desperate; a thought grabber. Too many of my thoughts escape through the holes in my brain.

I am not the first to seek such a device. Pascal lamented: “Thoughts come at random, and go at random. No device for holding on to them or for having them. A thought has escaped; I was trying to write it down: instead I write that it has escaped me.”

I empathize with Pascal, but my concern is quite practical: I keep a notebook of all my insights, especially those that miraculously arrive during, and as a result of, my prayers. I can usually remember all the insights I receive over a Shabbat, but a two day holiday often provides too much to recall. I want a device that will capture all my thoughts and insights. I assume that it will be in the shape of a helmet, hopefully not a black hat, battery operated to observe the laws of Shabbat and Yom Tov (Holydays) although it will come in rechargeable form for weekdays. I suspect that the physics will be less difficult than figuring out how to comfortably shape the device to be worn 24 hours a day, even when in the shower when the ideas for my newsletters appear and escape, and to allow a person to wear the headpiece without disturbing Teffilin – phylacteries.

I don’t want to scare you, but I would like to custom order a device that will catch some of the great thoughts that have appeared and disappeared over the ages. I promise not to violate anyone’s privacy. There is one person whose thoughts at a specific moment I must catch in my machine: The guilty Sotah who explodes. This woman obviously does not believe in God, otherwise she would not risk drinking the water. She drinks the water and for just a few seconds before she explodes knows that, oops, she was wrong. The water works. God does have power. (Even our friend Pascal tried to cover his bases: He sewed the following thoughts into the lining of his clothes: “God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob,” not of the philosophers and scientists. Certainty. Certainty. Feeling. Joy. Peace.) In the few seconds before she dies, this woman has absolute clarity that God exists and that her “miraculous” death will prove God’s power to all who are watching.

I want to use my device to catch that absolutely clear that at that moment.

She may have been a sinner, but she serves as a vehicle to prove God’s Power to others, and I suspect that the clarity of that fleeting thought purifies her soul.

So, dear Dr. Kaku, please suspend your work on String Theory and start working on my device. I want that one thought, even more than all the other thoughts that were part of the great escape!

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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5
May

The Attraction Of The Mystical

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

“I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God Who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.” (Galileo, 1615) I agree with Galileo, however, I seem to be in a shrinking minority. I have recently been inundated with stories of chimneys that serve as doorways for demons, lit matches that bring angels, and eggs under the pillow that help people find their future spouse. I’m convinced that there are invisible spiritual forces and beings around us, but I choose to use my “sense, reason, and intellect,” to make my choices. I fear paying attention to these mysterious and unexplainable things lest I fall into the habit of forgoing the use of my mind.

Judaism has practices that are based on the mysterious, but it never asks that we suspend our reason. People are constantly searching for the logical basis of each mystery that has been formalized in Jewish law because we know that the Divine gift of intellect is the most precious and demanding of all.

We translate Kabbalah as Mysticism, although it is the opposite.  Kabbalah seeks to explain the spiritual structure of existence. It is sophisticated and complex, which is quite different from mystical. It is only mystical to those who are unfamiliar with it.

The Hebrew word for world is ‘Olam’, which derives from ‘H’elem’, or ‘Hidden.’ Of course there are all sorts of spiritual realities hidden in our world. Our job and blessing is to discover and reveal that which is hidden. It is not to worship the hidden at the price of the rational. The verse says, “Reishit Chochma Yirat Hashem,” “The beginning of wisdom is awe of God,” which means that we acknowledge there is an area beyond our comprehension, but what comes immediately after the acknowledgement is Chochma, wisdom.

A person approaching the Temple to make an offering has a choice. Will he focus on the mysterious powers of the offering to bring forgiveness and blessing, associating the Temple Service with a different dimension of existence? Or, will he approach the Cohen, in his most important role, as a teacher who will explain the process as part of the structure of life? The first person will not be able to take his Temple experience home with him. The second will have used his offering to continue to transform his life long after he returns home. I choose to be the second person.

We face the same choice before we take our three steps back when we finish prayer: Am I leaving the prayer behind because it is not part of my “real” world, or will I take my prayer experience with me? I choose the latter.

The mystical offers an escape from life. Judaism focuses on Torat Chaim, living this life with passion and meaning. The mystical is a release from our limitations. Judaism guides us in how to overcome them. Mysticism is often a search for the magical, what I call Cheating. Judaism is a demand to be practical. The Mystic celebrates the magical powers of the righteous. The thinker rejoices over their teachings, wisdom and insight.

Hopefully, things will turn out better for me than they did for Galileo, because I’m sticking with him on this one. I invite you to join me.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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31
Aug

Elul: Love Songs: Stepping Toward

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Spiritual Growth

“I am to my beloved and my beloved is to me.” (Song of Songs 6:4)

Rabbi Eliezer of Worms, the Rokeach, explains this verse as describing the Teshuva process: With each step we take back toward our Beloved, God, He takes a step back toward us.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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22
Aug

Spiritual Sustenance

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Spiritual Growth

“Teshuva, Tzedaka, and Prayer, remove the worst part of the decree.”

Rabbi Shimon said, “Come and see: All foods of the inhabitants of the world derive from above. The food that comes from heaven and earth is food for the whole world; it is coarse and dense. (This refers to ordinary food of a material nature, which grows from the ground and is watered by rain.) Food coming from higher above is food that comes in Judgment (as a direct reflection of the spiritual achievements of the person), from a place where Judgment prevails (a place where everything is exactly as it should be); it is finer food. (For example: Matzah, deriving from the Divine Presence, who executes Divine Judgment.) The food that appeared for Israel at that time – from a high place called Heaven – Tiferet – is finer food, (Manna) entering the soul most deeply, dissociated ever more from the body, called Ethereal Bread (Numbers 21:5)

The highest food of all is food of the Companions, those engaging in Torah, who eat food of spirit and soul-breath – not eating food of the body at all – namely, from a high place, precious beyond all, called Wisdom – the primal Will to create a world in which we must master ourselves).

The first food is food of the whole world, that which derives from heaven and earth, food for all.

Food that is higher – that which is finer, deriving from a place where Judgment prevails, called Tzedek. This is food of the poor. Mystery of the matter: One who fulfills a poor person (Table Talk: Restoring a Lost Object) adds one letter to Tzedek, transforming it into Tzedaka. This is: “The man of kindness benefits his soul.” (Proverbs 11:17) Implying rendering kindness, for it dwells in Judgment and is fulfilled through Life Force, becoming Compassion.

Food higher than these is a supernal, precious food, from a place called Heaven. It is the food of the sick, as it is written: “God will sustain him on the bed of illness.” (Psalms 41:4) The sick are nourished only by the actual food of the Holy One, Blessed is He. (Just as the fat and limbs of offerings is presented to God, so a sick person is sustained by the fat and blood of his own body.)

Supernal, holy, precious food – food of spirit and soul-breath – is food from a supernal distant place. This is food of the Companions engaging (in the battle of) Torah, food coming from supernal Wisdom. Torah issues from supernal Wisdom, and those who engage in Torah enter the essence of her roots; so their food derives from that supernal holy place.

(Zohar, Volume 2:61b – 62a, Translation & Commentary by Daniel C. Matt – The Pritzker Edition 2007)

I would like to suggest that this Zohar is the secret to the mechanic’s of “Teshuva, Tzedaka, and Prayer, remove the worst part of the decree.” We can choose to eat the lowest form of food, meaning, to live a purely physical life, and to limit our vision to coarse things and thoughts. However, we will be vulnerable to the “worst parts of the decree” as we are attached to the natural occurrences of this world.

Tzedaka

However, we can rise and transform Tzedek – Justice – into Tzedaka – by completing others, and nourishing their bodies and souls. We can transform Matzah into Manna

And eat food that will elevate our bodies and souls beyond the limitations of this world, allowing us to escape the worst parts of the decree.

Teshuva

The Kabbalists often describe sin – or more accurately, mistaken directions – as illness. These mistakes are a symptom of a soul that is ill. When we acknowledge our mistakes but focus on the disease rather than symptoms, we transform Soul Sickness into Love Sickness – “My soul is love sick for You.” (Yedid Nefesh) We attach in that love and eat the food of the place called Heaven. We will be nourished and strengthened and able to transcend the ‘worst parts of the decree”.

Tefillah

The Companions who connect to the primal moment of creation are directly nourished by the Highest Source and can exist on food that derives from that supernal holy place. They live on Spiritual Sustenance and are not bound by physical limitations, the worst part of the decree.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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19
Aug

Sound Bites: Purposeful Breath

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

Rabbi Yose taught: Every action in which a person engages that is not in the service of the Holy One, Blessed is He, turns into a breath that goes drifting through the world. And when the person’s soul departs, that breath whirls it through the world like a stone in the sling (David and Goliath), as it is written, “The soul of your enemies He will sling from the hollow of a sling.” (Samuel I 25:29) Who will sling? That breath conducting it through the world. So, everything done under the sun that is not in the service of the Holy One, Blessed is He, turns into a breath – but it is breaking of spirit, for it breaks the spirit, rising and falling in the world, as it is written, Breath (ur’ut ruach), and shattering of spirit.” (Ecclesiastes 1:14)

But whatever is service of his Lord is called ‘above the sun’ and becomes a holy breath. This is seed sown by a person in that world. What is its name? Righteousness, as it is written, “Sow for yourselves righteousness.” (Hosea 10:12) This conducts a person when his soul departs from him, raising him to a place where supernal glory is found, to be bound in the bundle of eternal life, as it is written, “Your righteousness will march before you.” (Isaiah 58:8) – leading you, raising you. To where? To the place of which it is written, “The glory of God will gather you in.” (ibid.)

All those souls conducted by that holy breath are gathered in by the one called “Glory of God”, enwrapped within it, as it is written: “The glory of God will gather you in.” This is called “Tranquility of Spirit”.

Happy are the righteous for all their actions make them worthy of the World to Come.

(Zohar, Volume 2:59a-b, Translation & Commentary by Daniel C. Matt – The Pritzker Edition 2007)

Breath is used to describe the effect of non-purpose driven action as we breathe without thinking. We take it for granted and forget that God used His breath, so to speak, to blow a soul into Adam.

The breath that is used to sound the shofar is directed upward, to ‘above the sun’ to remind us that we must live with a sense of great purpose, and that all for which we ask on Rosh Hashana must be to help us achieve our purpose, master ourselves and cleave to God.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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15
Aug

Timeless: A Two Way Street

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer

“He recalled (Zachar) His kindness and His faithfulness to the House of Israel; all ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our Lord.” (Psalm 98:3)

Should you ask, that if God’s power was so great, why did He instruct Israel to borrow silver and gold from the Egyptians (Exodus 11:2), and why did Israel have to plunder Egypt? Why did God not simply force the Egyptians to hand over their gold and silver? The answer is that if God had done so the Egyptians would never have summoned the courage to pursue Israel. The sea would not have split and God’s Name would not have been aggrandized and sanctified as it was.

The Egyptians said to themselves that the fact that Israel had to use subterfuge was proof that they did not have the right to force their former masters to hand over their wealth. This allowed them to feel capable of vanquishing Israel. Thus, they pursued their slaves and the miracles of the Splitting of the Sea occurred.

Israel is given credit for having kept this plan, God’s secret, for over twelve months. (See Exodus 3:22, before the first of the plagues.) Had they leaked this information the miracle of the sea would have been aborted.

Because Israel kept its faith, after God remembered His kindness to Abraham, the ends of the earth witnessed our salvation by God.

(Alshich HaKadosh, Psalm 98:3)

The Alshich describes both God and Israel as being part of the Zachar – Remembering – or, what we are describing as the Timeless Process. Zachar in this verse is a two way street in which we keep our faith alive, connecting it with the past, and God responds with miracles and salvation, allowing us to be important parts of the Timeless Process.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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12
Aug

Yaacov Dovid Shulman Presents: Rav Kook: The Joy That Torah Gives Us

by admin in Spiritual Growth

The joy that the Torah gives us comes from the preponderance of light within the letters of the Torah, filled as they are with the life force of divine pleasure. These letters pervade the totality of our soul with the light of life and the joy of heaven.

This is a joy that flows from the letters themselves, which are already comprehended by the soul. But more than that, it flows from the glorious spiritual life force that constantly cascades from the supernal wellsprings.

That life force is much more exalted than the letters that are comprehended by the soul with which we can communicate. The light of those letters’ hidden joy is great, filled with a tranquility and wondrous pleasure, which nothing can equal.

Oros HaTorah 5:2

Yaacov Dovid Shulman’s Writings can be found at ravkook.net and jewishlights.blogspot.com

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12
Aug

Yaacov Dovid Shulman Presents Rav Kook on Positive Mindfulness

by admin in Spiritual Growth

When we elevate matters with our clarity of intent, our awareness continuously expands in the abundance of a superior reality. At that point, our desire–a desire of eternal love, of great love–for the light of the infinite is scented from the eden of life. Then we shall gaze and be illumined.

But if our mindfulness is dislodged and grows impoverished, the face of heaven darkens. Beauty turns to mourning and to barrenness. Then that clarifying process that comes from heaven, which demands the right to play its role, depresses the special mission of humanity. It dulls the light of mindfulness and the complete contents of a full life. This clarifying process, reaching to the root of all being, is a necessity: deeply implanted and flowing without cease. Now, the wellsprings of the flow of life dry up because our hands are feeble in dealing with the supernal Torah.

But everything returns to its light and to its shining life when we engage in supernal repentance filled with knowledge and positive mindfulness, illumined with the light of Torah contained within the wisdom of the Jewish people, which is the inheritance of our patriarchs and which is filled with an eternal glory.

The text of the blessing, “He planted eternal life within us,” refers to the oral Torah: in all its levels and in the totality of its beauty.


Oros Hatorah 3:2

Yaacov Dovid Shulman’s Writings can be found at ravkook.net and jewishlights.blogspot.com

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20
May

Pythagoras, Cholent, and Tznius (Modesty)

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Spiritual Growth

Pythagorus had a lot of influence for a man who probably never existed. The Pythagoreans invented their founder, including the manner of his death. Pyhthagoras had a strong revulsion to beans. He would definitely never have eaten Shabbat afternoon Cholent, and not because of its natural effects on the stomach, but because beans are not Tznius – not appropriate for a modest person: (Please do not read on if you are sensitive.) Bean may have been an Egyptian slang word for testicle. The Christian Bishop Hippolytus, in his Refutation of All Heresies (especially thefoundationstone.org) wrote that if beans are chewed and then left in the sun, they emit the smell of semen. Very not Tznius! There’s more! If one takes the bean in flower and buries it in the earth and, in a few days, digs it up: “It will have the appearance of something immodest.”

It seems that Pythagoras was very strict about Tznius: When running from the Syracusans during the war with Arigentum, he escaped because his followers formed a bridge over a fire with their bodies, only to be caught because he would not escape through a field of beans: not tznius! That’s commitment.

Even the great philosophers, if they truly existed, had their foibles.

Lately, I have been wondering if the manner in which we teach Tznius has become one of the foibles of certain religious communities.

I repeat: “The manner in which we teach the laws of Tznius.” I do not mean the laws of personal dignity.

If a teacher publicly humiliates a young girl for wearing a school uniform that is too tight; is she not stuck at Pythagoras’ field of beans? Is it Tznius – modesty to most – dignity to me – to humiliate someone? Did the “laws” of Tznius not just override the biblical commandments to love others, to rebuke in an effective manner, to not embarrass someone, to copy the ways of God in personal attributes, to avoid arrogance and numerous others? Is that public rebuke not a tergiversation (I wanted to use a word I learned today – not too modest, but hopefully dignified,) of all the lessons of Jewish law and thought?

I open this “blog” to you: How do you suggest we teach the concept of Tznius and its laws?

Please allow me one more reflection on this topic: I met a non-observant man this week who commented that he never understood the concept of Kedusha – Holiness – until he met a group of Satmar women. He used to laugh at their hats and dress. After one conversation he understood the concept of Holiness at least he sensed it. These were women who were untouchable simply by virtue of who they are as human beings. I can picture Reb Yoelish zt”l smiling with great pride.

Author Info:

Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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