Posts Tagged ‘Abraham’

11
Nov

Tested by Spiders

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

I only notice them on Shabbat, up toward the ceiling; spiders. There’s nothing I can do about them because of Shabbat. I may not kill them, or even trap them to move them outside. I may not even plan to kill them after Shabbat, because one may not plan on Shabbat to do something that is forbidden on Shabbat.

I suspect that these spiders have spent so much time in the house listening to shiurim that they are experts in the laws of Shabbat. The spiders disappear immediately after Havdalah. They know that they are perfectly safe from me on Shabbat and Jewish festivals; yes, they also come out on those days, although, they avoid the living room on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur where we hold services. The spiders in my house are familiar with Halachah, respectful of prayer, and committed to test my observance.

I could, of course, determine that they are poisonous, finding justification to trap them, but they remain in one place all day and pose no threat. Perhaps they know even more Jewish law than I suspect. How sad that my biggest temptation to violate Shabbat has to do with spiders! The real test is not even the desire to kill them, but how they occupy my mind all day, disturb my peace. I have trouble maintaining my concentration for 25 hours because of tiny, albeit smart, spiders. I wonder how Abraham remained focused for 72 hours while headed to Moriah to offer Isaac to God.  The Midrash describes Satan as appearing as a huge river on the way, but I suspect that it was not a huge hindrance, but a series of minor distractions along the way, something such as, well, spiders. Abraham managed his spiders much better than do I.

Satan’s distractions were not intended to stop Abraham from offering Isaac, but from being able to make every moment of the three day trip part of the offering. I can attend prayers, properly celebrate the Shabbat meals, and still have hours of non-Shabbat, distracted from the nature of the day. You see, even when I am frustrated by spiders, I am thinking about Shabbat; how to apply her laws to the situation. The challenge is to focus even the most trivial concerns around Shabbat. Abraham could have remained in contact with his financial advisor even while traveling to Moriah, but he left his iPhone at home. He wanted to use every moment of the trip as part of his offering.

We tend to think of the Evil Inclination’s challenges as huge rivers and mountains and forget that he will take advantage of our concern for the big tests to distract us in small ways…with spiders.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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28
Oct

A Splendid Torch

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

“Life is no brief candle for me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations (George Bernard Shaw).”

This week we are introduced to the story of a man who changed history; he was a traveller, he insisted that marriages remain within the extended family, he was willing to sacrifice his child to his god:

“This is the account of Terah’s family line. Terah became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran. And Haran became the father of Lot.  While his father Terah was still alive, Haran died in Ur of the Chaldeans, in the land of his birth.  Abram and Nahor both married. The name of Abram’s wife was Sarai, and the name of Nahor’s wife was Milkah; she was the daughter of Haran, the father of both Milkah and Iskah. Now Sarai was childless because she was not able to conceive.

Terah took his son Abram, his grandson Lot son of Haran, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, the wife of his son Abram, and together they set out from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to Canaan. But when they came to Harran, they settled there. Terah lived 205 years, and he died in Harran (Genesis 11:27-32).” The Midrash adds that Terah was born circumcised. It all sounds like someone else we know.

Terach’s son, Abraham, certainly managed to do all his father did, and to do it all in his own way. However, when Joshua, towards the end of his life, renews the covenant between God and Israel in Shechem, he indicates that Terach’s role is more than fathering Abraham:

“Then Joshua assembled all the tribes of Israel at Shechem. He summoned the elders, leaders, judges and officials of Israel, and they presented themselves before God.

Joshua said to all the people, “This is what the LORD, the God of Israel, says: ‘Long ago your ancestors, including Terah the father of Abraham and Nahor, lived beyond the Euphrates River and worshiped other gods. But I took your father Abraham from the land beyond the Euphrates and led him throughout Canaan and gave him many descendants. I gave him Isaac, and to Isaac I gave Jacob and Esau. I assigned the hill country of Seir to Esau, but Jacob and his family went down to Egypt (Joshua 24:1-4).” We mention Terach as part of the Haggadah story. There seems to be more to him than we assume.

In a portion that includes the tale of the Tower of Babel, when all were united, we are introduced to a man who wants to make his own way: As soon as his children were married, “Terah took his son Abram, his grandson Lot son of Haran, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, the wife of his son Abram, and together they set out from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to Canaan.” Terach wanted to light a torch that would, “burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.” Something happened. Terach stopped. “But when they came to Harran, they settled there. Terah lived 205 years, and he died in Harran.” Terach wanted to make his own mark on the world, but he knew only that. He did not know what mark to make. He stopped in Harran, and there he died.

Terach was not his son, Abraham, who did know how he wanted to change the world, and yet, he is still remembered, because even an unfulfilled desire to move out on his own, to make a mark on the world, was sufficient to inspire Abraham to become the Patriarch of Israel.

Terach’s torch still burns in the souls of his descendants motivating them to move ahead and attempt to light their own torch. It was Abraham who taught us how to fuel the torch, and directed us in how to move without stopping in Harran.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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27
Oct

Don’t Ask NOW!

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

I’m still receiving questions about Halacha’s perspective on the deal to free Gilad Shalit. The answer is, “I’m not sure.” My question is, “Why are you asking now rather than five years ago?”

People are still asking me about the Halacha regarding the community’s response to sex abuse stories from a few years ago. My response is, “Rather than wait for the next tragic case, we should formulate a thorough Halachic system before we again are forced to face the issue.”

I am often asked to rule on complex business arrangements when partners are arguing. My response always begins, “Did you consult a Halachic authority before negotiating the terms of your partnership?”

When couples come to ask for Halachic guidance for their relationship, I ask, “Did you study the laws of marriage before you married?”

Why do we wait until after the fact to consult Halacha?

This is an ancient issue: We find no indication of Noah, during the 120 years he was working on the Ark, and the next year spent inside the Ark, asking God or even considering what he should do after the Flood. How does someone spend more than a century preparing for a Flood not plan for life afterward?

The Midrash teaches that Noah took a vine from the Garden of Eden to plant after the Flood, which is not planning anything other than attempting to recreate the world as it was before. The verse describes Noah as, “The man of the earth (9:20),” another Adam. Perhaps Noah believed that he, described by God as, “Righteous before Me (7:1),” could succeed where Adam failed. How does a man who believes and even plans to be the successful Adam end up, “drunk, and he uncovered himself within his tent”? The only thing at which Noah succeeds in contributing to the future is blessing and cursing his children. (Which, of course, raises the question of how does a failed Noah offer blessings that shape the future of mankind?) If Noah possessed such power, imagine what he could have accomplished with more planning, with guidance from God.

“But I will establish My covenant with you (6:18).” “And as for Me, behold, I establish My covenant with you and with your offspring after you (9:9).” God repeatedly speaks to Noach of the future, and yet, Noah does not respond with forward thinking. It’s as if Noah is stuck in his role of saving the remnant of the past and is unwilling, perhaps unable to plan. A person who is constantly looking at his previous roles, preserving the past, will not learn how to use the very strengths that allow him to save the world to build a new one. And that, is where the issue of when do we consult Halacha, comes into play.

The same people who wait to ask for Halachic guidance about negotiating with Hamas, responding to sexual abuse allegations, dealing with business conflict, and guidance in relationships, will ask about Shabbat, Kashrut and Family Purity, before a question arises. They approach Halacha that doesn’t challenge them to rethink all they are doing. They hesitate to ask Halacha about how to plan, how to challenge their perceptions, and how to recreate their world.

Couples will come to a rabbi to resolve a conflict about an offer of a new job that will demand more hours at work, allowing less time at home (a serious Halachic issue), after the job has been offered, rather than discuss the question before the husband starts looking for another job. Their decision that he has to look for another job has been made. They have made up their minds, and are unaware or unwilling to submit their decision to a Halachic perspective. They want to protect their decision from being challenged. Halacha is perceived as interference. They are willing to, “Walk with God 6:9),” as did Noah, unwilling to, “Walk before Me (17:1),” as did Abraham. They are interested in keeping their marriage steady. They do not hear Halacha’s call to make marriage extraordinary.

Halacha can be used to “walk with,” to help a person keep his life on a steady course, or it can be used to, “Walk before Me,” to consider new ways to approach life. When we examine a government’s decisions after they are made, we are sending a message that Halacha is another voice of criticism. We are failing to project Halacha as a vision of how we can approach future issues.

The question is not about the Halachic justification of the deal for Gilad. We dare not send him the message that his freedom was bought at the expense of Torah. Our challenge is to formulate a Halachic response that offers a serious option for the future. Abraham, the one who, “Walk(ed) before Me,” is the man of Halacha. Noah was not. He was a great man who saved the world, but he did not know how to build a new one.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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28
Oct

Abraham the Matchmaker, by Prof. Gerald August

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

Was Abraham a good matchmaker? At first glance, what is the question? After all, Eliezer does find a good match for Isaac.

If we look a little closer, Eliezer realized he needed more information about the woman. Abraham told him not to pick from a Canaanite woman because he did not like their ethical standards. So he sent Eliezer with a charge to pick from his family’s household in Nahor

So why doesn’t Eliezer just go to Nahor and ask someone where the family resides? Why does he go where everyone from the town congregates? Why does he ask for a sign? And why is the sign specifically an act of kindness? Kindness is a good thing. But maybe Isaac, being a sheltered person, needed a woman with street smarts.

Perhaps the answer is as follows. Abraham had been away from his hometown and family for many decades. He had a good situation in his family and his hometown and was away for a long time. However, not being in the town and with the family, he did not know what the situation was now. How could he? So, according to Abraham’s instructions, whoever was from the family would have been a good match.

However, Eliezer did not see it that way. He wanted a sign that whoever was chosen needed to be on the ethical level Abraham sought in a wife for Isaac.

But why did he pick kindness?

Because ethics deals with relations with other people. And people who are kind have an outer focus. They look and see what is needed for the other person, not for themselves, and they act accordingly. That is the type of person Eliezer understood would be good for Isaac. And why did Eliezer understand that very well? Because Eliezer was a faithful servant. And a servant is someone who is focused on the other person and is there to serve the other person. The same type of focus that is the essence of a kind person.

An important lesson we learn is not to idealize the past. We may have had a wonderful childhood in a particular city. And having not lived there for a while we continue to view the city in past terms. But perhaps this city devolved into a dangerous place.

The lesson is important. Those things and thoughts and ideas that have worked for us in the past may not be appropriate for our present situation. So we need to reevaluate what we are doing on a constant basis. One time we all do this is on Rosh Hashanah. But what about the rest of the year? How can we institute an ongoing review? It is too intense to do on a weekly basis.

But the calendar comes to our rescue. The new month. Once a month we can sit down for a few minutes and evaluate the last month. What has been working? What has not been working?

Ask a friend to help you with this. Just like Eliezer was a good friend to Abraham by realizing what needed to be changed, a good friend can help you.

Make a good match for yourself. Match yourself with a realistic and doable month.

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25
Oct

Eishet Chayil: Finding What Was Lost

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week, Relationships

A world you would share with Logan Killicks is evidently not the same world you would share with Vergible “Tea Cake” Woods. In “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” Zora Neale Hurston tells the story of Janie’s progress through three marriages: “She knew that God tore down the old world every evening and built a new one by sun-up. It was wonderful to see it take form with the sun and emerge from the gray dust of its making. The familiar people and things had failed her so she hung over the gate and looked up the road towards way off.”

People who love Hurston will probably enjoy “Middlemarch,” itself a story of a girl who takes some time to find the man she really loves. It is about the discovery of self in and through another. (Zadie Smith: “Changing My Mind”)

Whenever I sing “Eishet Chayil,” “A woman of valor; who can find?” I cannot help but think whether we are familiar with the idea of “discovering ourselves in and through an other,” in this case, a spouse, more specifically; a wife.

Perhaps we can translate the opening verse of the song (not the opening verse of the final chapter of Proverbs) as, “Who has learned to find himself in his relationship with his wife of valor?”

We understandably fear teaching this aspect of relationship lest we fall into the same trap as Hurston’s Janie, and Rand’s Dagny Talbot. We certainly do not want our children to feel that they can flit and float from one relationship to another as they find someone who will help them discover new and different parts of themselves.

However, the Sages teach that the search for the right partner in life is a search for self; “As a person searching for something precious that he lost.” His soul knows that there is that perfect soulmate, and searches for her. The soul searches for the person who mill complete him. King Solomon, he with the thousand wives, insisted on speaking of finding and discovery in marriage.

We encourage our children to search for the right Shidduch, their “Bashert,” as they say, but we do not teach them how to join in a process of self-discovery, the process meant by Solomon’s challenge, “A woman of valor; who can find?”

When the Midrash Tanchumah describes this chapter as Abraham’s eulogy for Sarah, they are describing one of the most accomplished human beings in history insisting that he became who he was – he discovered himself – only through Sarah. He could no longer be a searcher or discoverer. Abraham had to send Eliezer to find a wife for Isaac.

Let us read this chapter so familiar from Shabbat meals and weddings as a guide to using marriage as a process of discovery:

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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21
Oct

The Ram’s Blessing by Prof. Gerald August

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Portion of the Week

Isaac is spared at the last moment. And we read that Abraham was blessed. And many people think that Abraham gets the blessing because he was willing to sacrifice his son. But let’s look at the sequence of events.

The angel says to Abraham, “Lay not  your hand upon the boy, for now I know you fear G-d”. That is all that is said to Abraham.  Then Abraham takes the ram and  offers  it as a burnt offering. Only then does Abraham get the blessing: that his seed will be multiplied, and through his seed all the nations will be blessed.

If Abraham had not offered the ram, it seems like there would have been no blessing. Why does Abraham only get the blessing after he offers the ram?

Perhaps the answer is as follows.

When Abraham was told not to sacrifice Isaac, nothing happens. That was what the angel said. Do not do anything. When Abraham sacrifices the ram, something happens. This foreshadows all of the negative and positive commandments. Some things you do not do. It produces bad results. And so it is a mitzvah not to do certain things.

But being passive does not produce results. It does not help people or advance knowledge or relationships. It does not build housing nor produce food. There needs to be positive movement. There needs to be action.

If you look closely at the 22nd chapter, verse 16 and 17, it is spelled out. It says, “because you have done this thing AND not withheld your son, I will greatly bless you”.

The practical application is clear. To be a good person you need to not only not do bad, you need to do good. You need to actively search out and recognize the good things to be done, just as Abraham looked at the ram and recognized a good thing to be done.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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21
Oct

The Open Door

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

I remember certain moments in my life by the doors I entered. I stood before each of those doors and realized that the moment I stepped through, my life would be changed. I knew as I stood before the doors to the main sanctuary of the Jewish Center before my Chupah, that I was about to enter an entirely new stage of life.

I have seen too many operating room doors to count. For some reason, the few seconds from when I first glanced the doors until I was wheeled through are more potent memories than my first glimpse of the operating table. They represented entrance into the unknown.

I stopped with my hand on the door before entering the hospital room in which my father died. My life would never be the same once I opened that door. I could not stop whatever was happening, but for some reason, I felt I could delay the inevitable by not opening the door.

I would stop before the door of our house before entering after a long trip abroad. I would picture the faces of my wife and children and experienced walking through that doorway as reentering life as it should be.

All my life I had heard descriptions of the Ari’s Mikvah in Safed. I sucked in the few seconds before entering recalling my imagination’s picture of the cave so I could compare it to the real thing.

We all have our own ways to describe that magical sense of approaching a dramatic change. I associate many such moments with doors.

I have watched people refuse to enter a doctor’s office because they did not want to hear what he was going to say. I have often seen people stop before the doors of a supervisor because they sensed that they were about to be laid off. I watch young men and women hesitate before the doorway into the room where they will take a test that will shape their lives.

This is why Abraham sat “before” the entrance to his tent: He wanted to guide people even as they opened the door into a different world; a world of sharing, a world of Godliness, a world of constant change.

My father zt’l never directly entered the door to the Beit Midrash or synagogue. He paused to prepare himself to step through the door. He taught me to do the same. He held my tiny hand in his and paused before knocking on the door to Reb Moshe zt”l’s apartment. He wanted me to know that I was about step into a different world.

I imagine Abraham sitting before me, waiting to escort me into this week’s portion. I want him to guide me into and through his stories. I see an open door before me each time I open a holy text. I pause for a moment as I consider that my life is about to change.

So, if you ever see me walking around with an open door swung over my shoulder; you’ll know why!

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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20
Oct

Meetings With Angels

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

They appeared as human beings to Abraham, but as angels, to Lot.

They appeared directly before Lot, but as voices from heaven to Hagar in the desert and to Abraham at the Binding of Isaac.

They are the guardians of Eden, and they are the fallen sinners.

They bring healing and they bring destruction.

They bring good news for some, and bad news to others.

They are magical and powerful, and they are vulnerable and limited.

They are mysterious heavenly beings, and they are jobbers and accessible.

Who are these beings? Why do they play such important roles in the stories of Genesis? Why are the stories of the beginnings of humanity so rich with characters so unfamiliar?

The key lies in the difference between their appearance to Abraham and to Lot. Abraham saw three men. Lot saw angels. When Abraham saw a higher spiritual being, he saw something he could be. Lot looked and saw angels: they are so much higher than I that I cannot aspire to live at their level.

They do not appear differently to Abraham and Lot; they appear the same. The difference is one of perception.

Whose approach do we emulate when we describe the great people of the past as supermen, almost as angels? Are we aspiring or are we finding a reason to not demand that we rise to their level?

Why are there so many meetings with angels? The Torah is asking us whether we look and see angels, beyond what we could ever hope to be, or human beings we can emulate and match?

Our history is filled with human beings who aspired to live higher than angels. They are the people who have taught us to fly, grow and accomplish great things.

We have nothing from angels other than some interesting stories.

The Foundation Stone™ and The Foundation Stone™Blog were formed to help us as human beings, rise on our wings of desire to live higher than angels and to learn how to joyously soar with those wings.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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19
Oct

The Wisdom of Sharing IV: Through His Eyes

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

“For now I know that you are a God-fearing man – ‘Yirai Elokim’.” (22:12) “Yirai” also means to see; The Angel was saying, “For now I know that you see the world as do I!”

“And Abraham raised his eyes and saw – and behold, a ram! afterwards, caught in the thicket.” (Verse 13) “And the Lord saw that the light was good.” (Genesis 1:4)  The one who now saw the world through God’s eyes, could see differently, “He raised his vision.”

The verse in the Creation story continues, “And the Lord separated between the light and the darkness.” Rashi comments, “He decreed that the light should not be mingled with the darkness, but should function independently.”

“Behold, a ram, afterwards, caught in the thicket.” Abraham saw the entanglements of the world with his new eyes, with his ability to share God’s view of reality.

“Abraham called the name of that site “Hashem Yireh,” (22:14) Abraham named Mt Moriah as the place where we can see the world as does God – the place we can share His vision.

Abraham taught us that we can use God’s Torah and Mitzvot to see the world through God’s eyes – to share His vision of reality.

This is the highest level of the Wisdom of Sharing.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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19
Oct

The Wisdom of Sharing III: I Can’t Believe He Ate The Whole Thing!

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

Another popsicle story! Yes, for good reason:

My mother ybcl”c was in the hospital over Shavuot 1963. The Baltimore heat was unbearable. My father zt”l walked a few miles to the hospital, and then walked home. He entered the house, collapsed in a chair, and asked me for a popsicle. I ran to the freezer, grabbed a popsicle, and, as always instructed, split it into two, bringing one stick to my suffering father. He looked at me, smiled, and said, “Please bring the other half.” I was shocked as I had never seen anyone eat an entire popsicle, but, you do what your father requests, so I brought the second stick. He quickly finished both sticks and asked for another whole popsicle. My sister and I stood staring at someone eating two whole popsicles.

I turned to my sister and said, “I can’t wait until I am a father and am allowed to eat a whole popsicle!” Another sister looked at me with disgust, “Don’t you realize how hot he is? He is suffering! He’s exhausted. His wife is in the hospital. He has you as a son. You should feel bad for him, not jealous.”

I admit that I did not understand what she was talking about. I was too shocked by my father’s ability to eat two whole popsicles. I wanted to offer to walk to the hospital and back so I could have the same feast. I could only see the world through the eyes of a four year old; how could you possibly feel bad for someone who can eat so many treats?

“Then Abimelech summoned Abraham and said to him, ‘What have you done to us? How have I sinned against you that you brought upon me and my kingdom such great sin? Deeds that ought not to be done have you done to me!’ And Abimelech said to Abraham, ‘What did you see that you did such a thing?’ And Abraham said, ‘Because I said, There is no fear of God in this place and they will slay me because of my wife. Moreover, she is indeed my sister, my father’s daughter, though not my mother’s daughter; and she became my wife.’” (20:9-12)

Abimelech was sufficiently astute to ask, ‘What did you see that you did such a thing?’ even after his first tirade. He was willing to consider that Abraham had a reason. As astute as he was, Abimelech could not understand Abraham’s reasons. He saw the world only as he could see it. His life vocabulary did not include “There is no fear of God in this place.”

Abimelech never completely understood Abraham; “I do not know who did this thing; furthermore, you have never told me, and, moreover, I myself have heard nothing of it except for today.” (21:26) He didn’t understand Abraham anymore than I as a four year old could understand what my father was experiencing that day.

This portion is filled with stories of Abraham acting in ways inexplicable to his contemporaries: Why the “Plains of Mamre”? Abraham consulted with Mamre about circumcision, which would seem incomprehensible to others. Praying for Sodom, the antithesis of Abraham! Expelling Hagar and Yishmael with insufficient food and water! Not opening his arms to Lot after the destruction of Sodom. The Abimelech stories. Most of all, the Akeidah, the Binding of Isaac. The man of sharing, the master of Chesed, acted in ways impossible to share with the world.

The Wisdom of Sharing includes boundaries: Parents who want to share everything with their children, and will speak openly of their problems, lack those boundaries. Teachers who don’t consider how much wisdom to share in a lecture, offering a hint of infinite wisdom beyond what they are sharing, lack the boundaries of the Wisdom of Sharing.

And there’s more…

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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