‘Spiritual Growth’ Category Archives

23
Apr

The Flow of Time

by admin in Spiritual Growth

Older children, born when their parents were beginning their life and moving around from one job to another, often envy their younger siblings who arrived into a more stable and mature home. The younger siblings envy missing the adventures experienced when the family was still forming and their parents were less established. Those who were present at the beginning often yearn to have been there at the ending. Those who were at the ending yearn for the experiences at the beginning.

We are in middle of the Counting of the Omer, which began on the second night of Pesach and ends on Shavuot. We count each day as an ending; “Today is the twenty- third day to the Omer.” We count what we have already accomplished. Yet, we see each day as bringing us closer to the day we celebrate the Revelation at Sinai. We see each day as a beginning and an ending.

This seems to take us all the way back to the first day of creation, when the verse says, “It was evening and it was morning, day one.” Evening is the end of the day and the beginning of the night. Morning is its mirror image. The first day was both a beginning and an ending.

Perhaps this is why the verse says, “He (Aaron) shall not come at anytime into the Holy,” meaning, he should not enter with any sense of time, beginning or end. We do not pray as if we are at the beginning or at the end of something. We enter the Holy status of prayer beyond time. We do not perform any of the Mitzvot as a beginning or an end, but as part of a constant flow, morning and evening, beyond time. We want to connect with God, Who lives beyond any physical limitations, including time. When we can connect to the flow of time, the first second of creation connecting with every moment until the end of time, we connect with God without limitation.

Hopefully, you recently received an invitation to a series of live Video conference classes on the Book of Ruth. There are still a few seats open, and I invite you to participate in this exciting series. Please note that you must register in order to participate. For quick register, click here. You can see the complete series here.

I wish you a Shabbat that is a morning and an evening, not just the end of one week and the beginning of the next, but a connection to the flow of time that allows us to simultaneously participate in the beginning and the end, and connect to the Eternal.

Thank you & Shabbat Shalom

Rabbi Simcha L. Weinberg

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11
Sep

Pig Wrestling

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Spiritual Growth

“I learned long ago, never wrestle with a pig, you get dirty; and besides, the pig likes it.” George Bernard Shaw

I agree with Shaw, and yet, I see all sorts of people pig-wrestling. We recite numerous Viduiim, or, confessions, from a few days before Rosh Hashanah through Yom Kippur. I watch people crushed by guilt over their numerous mistakes, imperfections and sins, who promise themselves that they will never sin again. They are directly confronting their Yetzer Harah, Evil Inclination. They lost before and they will lose again. Basically, they are pig wrestling and are bound to get dirty. At least the pig likes it!

Pig wrestling is not the proper response to Vidui. We are not encouraged to directly confront our mighty adversary. We are asked to develop strategies that will help us in battle.

I hope you will read and benefit from The Seven Levels of Teshuvah series, and the three commentaries on the Vidui. No matter what you do, please, never wrestle with a pig. It’s not worth it.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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10
Sep

Knowing

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

The people of Nineveh committed to fast and pray until God rescinded the decree of destruction. They ended their fast and prayers. How did they know that they were safe?

Jonah was angry that the people of Nineveh were saved. He had not received a prophecy informing him that God had rescinded the decree. How did he know?

They knew. There is such a thing as knowing that our prayers have been accepted.

When I began building my Succah this evening, immediately after Yom Kippur, I realized that I too, know. My Yom Kippur prayers were accepted. My Succah is my statement that I can now live sheltered by the Wings of God; His Divine Presence. It is only because I know that my prayers were accepted. What a feeling!

Author Info: 



Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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15
Jul

Kinah 3 – Gaining From Crying

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

Negative Emotions Are Key to Well-Being

Feeling sad, mad, critical or otherwise awful? Surprise: negative emotions are essential for mental health

By Tori Rodriguez

A client sits before me, seeking help untangling his relationship problems. As a psychotherapist, I strive to be warm, nonjudgmental and encouraging. I am a bit unsettled, then, when in the midst of describing his painful experiences, he says, “I’m sorry for being so negative.”

A crucial goal of therapy is to learn to acknowledge and express a full range of emotions, and here was a client apologizing for doing just that. In my psychotherapy practice, many of my clients struggle with highly distressing emotions, such as extreme anger, or with suicidal thoughts. In recent years I have noticed an increase in the number of people who also feel guilty or ashamed about what they perceive to be negativity. Such reactions undoubtedly stem from our culture’s overriding bias toward positive thinking. Although positive emotions are worth cultivating, problems arise when people start believing they must be upbeat all the time.

In fact, anger and sadness are an important part of life, and new research shows that experiencing and accepting such emotions are vital to our mental health. Attempting to suppress thoughts can backfire and even diminish our sense of contentment. “Acknowledging the complexity of life may be an especially fruitful path to psychological well-being,” says psychologist Jonathan M. Adler of the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering.

Meaningful Misery

Positive thoughts and emotions can, of course, benefit mental health. Hedonic theories define well-being as the presence of positive emotion, the relative absence of negative emotion and a sense of life satisfaction. Taken to an extreme, however, that definition is not congruent with the messiness of real life. In addition, people’s outlook can become so rosy that they ignore dangers or become complacent [see “Can Positive Thinking Be Negative?” by Scott O. Lilienfeld and Hal Arkowitz; Scientific American Mind, May/June 2011].

Eudaemonic approaches, on the other hand, emphasize a sense of meaning, personal growth and understanding of the self—goals that require confronting life’s adversities. Unpleasant feelings are just as crucial as the enjoyable ones in helping you make sense of life’s ups and downs. “Remember, one of the primary reasons we have emotions in the first place is to help us evaluate our experiences,” Adler says.

Adler and Hal E. Hershfield, a professor of marketing at New York University, investigated the link between mixed emotional experience and psychological welfare in a group of people undergoing 12 sessions of psychotherapy. Before each session, participants completed a questionnaire that assessed their psychological well-being. They also wrote narratives describing their life events and their time in therapy, which were coded for emotional content. As Adler and Hershfield reported in 2012, feeling cheerful and dejected at the same time—for example, “I feel sad at times because of everything I’ve been through, but I’m also happy and hopeful because I’m working through my issues”—preceded improvements in well-being over the next week or two for subjects, even if the mixed feelings were unpleasant at the time. “Taking the good and the bad together may detoxify the bad experiences, allowing you to make meaning out of them in a way that supports psychological well-being,” the researchers found.

Negative emotions also most likely aid in our survival. Bad feelings can be vital clues that a health issue, relationship or other important matter needs attention, Adler points out. The survival value of negative thoughts and emotions may help explain why suppressing them is so fruitless. In a 2009 study psychologist David J. Kavanagh of Queensland University of Technology in Australia and his colleagues asked people in treatment for alcohol abuse and addiction to complete a questionnaire that assessed their drinking-related urges and cravings, as well as any attempts to suppress thoughts related to booze over the previous 24 hours. They found that those who often fought against intrusive alcohol-related thoughts actually harbored more of them. Similar findings from a 2010 study suggested that pushing back negative emotions could spawn more emotional overeating than simply recognizing that you were, say, upset, agitated or blue.

Even if you successfully avoid contemplating a topic, your subconscious may still dwell on it. In a 2011 study psychologist Richard A. Bryant and his colleagues at the University of New South Wales in Sydney told some participants, but not others, to suppress an unwanted thought prior to sleep. Those who tried to muffle the thought reported dreaming about it more, a phenomenon called dream rebound.

Suppressing thoughts and feelings can even be harmful. In a 2012 study psychotherapist Eric L. Garland of Florida State University and his associates measured a stress response based on heart rate in 58 adults in treatment for alcohol dependence while exposing them to alcohol-related cues. Subjects also completed a measure of their tendency to suppress thoughts. The researchers found that those who restrained their thinking more often had stronger stress responses to the cues than did those who suppressed their thoughts less frequently.

Accepting the Pain

Instead of backing away from negative emotions, accept them. Acknowledge how you are feeling without rushing to change your emotional state. Many people find it helpful to breathe slowly and deeply while learning to tolerate strong feelings or to imagine the feelings as floating clouds, as a reminder that they will pass. I often tell my clients that a thought is just a thought and a feeling just a feeling, nothing more.

If the emotion is overwhelming, you may want to express how you feel in a journal or to another person. The exercise may shift your perspective and bring a sense of closure. If the discomfort lingers, consider taking action. You may want to tell a friend her comment was hurtful or take steps to leave the job that makes you miserable.

You may also try doing mindfulness exercises to help you become aware of your present experience without passing judgment on it. One way to train yourself to adopt this state is to focus on your breathing while meditating and simply acknowledge any fleeting thoughts or feelings. This practice may make it easier to accept unpleasant thoughts [see “Being in the Now,” by Amishi P. Jha; Scientific American Mind, March/April 2013]. Earlier this year Garland and his colleagues found that among 125 individuals with a history of trauma who were also in treatment for substance dependence, those who were naturally more mindful both coped better with their trauma and craved their drug less. Likewise, in a 2012 study psychologist Shannon Sauer-Zavala of Boston University and her co-workers found that a therapy that included mindfulness training helped individuals overcome anxiety disorders. It worked not by minimizing the number of negative feelings but by training patients to accept those feelings.

“It is impossible to avoid negative emotions altogether because to live is to experience setbacks and conflicts,” Sauer-Zavala says. Learning how to cope with those emotions is the key, she adds. Indeed, once my client accepted his thoughts and feelings, shaking off his shame and guilt, he saw his problems with greater clarity and proceeded down the path to recovery.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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15
Jul

Kinah 1 – Motivation

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

When we consider how this Tisha b’Av Kinah or Lamentation describes our responsibility for all the Tisha b’Av tragedies that occurred, we are liable to think of our relationship with God solely through the eyes of Reward and Punishment. We risk losing our motivation as described in: Dan Pink: The Puzzle of Motivation.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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14
Jul

Kinah 15-The Poison Squad

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

The menu for the 1902 holiday dinner had a healthy serving of Borax, yes, the poison, after the apple sauce, after the soup, again, after the turkey, vegetables, and a final serving after dessert and coffee.

Harvey Washington Wiley, a chemist from the US Department of Agriculture, assembled Poison Squads, to test preservatives and additives to processed foods. He suspected that the country was suffering from coast-to-coast poisoning, strictly due to commercial food production (Deborah Blum, Death In The Pot).

Wiley even had a son about his experiments: The Song of the Poison Squad:

For we are the Pizen Squad

On Prussic acid we break our fast;

We lunch on morphine stew;

We dine with a match-head consommé

drink carbolic acid (Borax) brew

 

This Kinah describes how we continue to drink a Poison Stew, the Golden Calf Consommé, in two different ways:

“He remembers my circling the Golden Calf in the desert heat. He insists that He will never forget even as the shadows of evening grow long, “I will bring a sword against you.”

Rav Oshaia said: Until Jeroboam, Israel imbibed a sinful disposition from one calf; but from him onwards, from two or three calves.

Rav Isaac said: No retribution whatsoever comes upon the world which does not contain a slight fraction of the first calf, as it is written, “Nevertheless in the day when I visit, I will visit their sin upon them (Exodus 32:34.” [Sanhedrin 102a]

We drink from the negative power of the sin: “Israel imbibed a sinful disposition from one calf.”

We sip at its consequences: “No retribution whatsoever comes upon the world which does not contain a slight fraction of the first calf.”

The author even finds a hint to the Golden Calf in the story of Revelation: “I will bring a sword against you.” One of the primary laws of the Altar is, And if you make for Me an altar of stone, you shalt not build it of hewn stones; for if you wave your sword upon it, you will have profaned it (Exodus 20:21).” This, of course, brings us back to the expulsion from Eden, “So He drove out the man; and He placed at the east of the garden of Eden the cherubim, and the flaming sword which turned every way, to guard the way to the Tree of Life (Genesis 3:24).”

“East of the garden of Eden,” takes us back to the penultimate verse in Lamentations, “Bring us back to You, God, and we shall return, renew our days as of old,” “Days of old,” kiKedem, can also mean, “as is East of Eden.”

After Adam was expelled, he had only to battle the sword to regain access to the Garden, eat of the Tree of Knowledge, and become immortal – but he never did. We want an opportunity to have the same access to the boundaries of Eden, “On the East,” so that we can demonstrate our willingness to overcome the first sword, empowering us to overcome the sword that, “I will bring a sword against you.”

The poison we are drinking, predates the Golden Calf, and goes all the way back to Adam; it is the poison of fear that blocks us from achieving our potential.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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11
Jul

Kinah 26- Growing Old

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

Many people have been speaking of old age, specifically, an essay by Oliver Sacks: “When my time comes, I hope I can die in harness, as Francis Crick did. When he was told that his colon cancer had returned, at first he said nothing; he simply looked into the distance for a minute and then resumed his previous train of thought. When pressed about his diagnosis a few weeks later, he said, “Whatever has a beginning must have an ending.” When he died, at 88, he was still fully engaged in his most creative work.”

Oliver Sacks – The Joy of Old Age. (No Kidding.)

When I think of the Patriarchs, I imagine them living their old age as did Francis Crick, and as is Dr. Sacks. We are introduced to Abraham when he was seventy-five, and he surely seems to live at that point and for many more decades as Hokusai wrote in the preface to his Hundred Views of Fuji:

“All I have produced before the age of seventy is not worth taking into account.

At seventy-three I learned a little about the real structure of nature, of animals, plants, trees, birds, fishes and insects.

In consequence when I am eighty, I shall have made still more progress. At ninety I shall penetrate the mystery of things; at a hundred I shall certainly have reached a marvelous stage; and when I am a hundred and ten, everything I do, be it a dot or a line, will be alive. I beg those who live as long as I to see if I do not keep my word. Written at the age of seventy-five by me, once Hokusai, today Gwakio Rojin, the old man mad about drawing.”

However, when we read of Jeremiah running to the grave of the Patriarchs at the time of the Destruction, begging them to pray for their children, I imagine Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob rising up in the more classical approach to growing old:

What is it to grow old?” asked Matthew Arnold, and gave a depressing answer:

…’Tis not to have our life

Mellowed and softened as with sunset-glow

…’Tis not to see the world

As from a height, with rapt prophetic eyes,

And heart profoundly stirred. . . .

It is to spend long days

And not once feel that we were ever young;

. . . Deep in our hidden heart

Festers the dull remembrance of a change,

But no emotion–none!

Everyone remembers Cephalus, Plato’s dear old man at the beginning of the Republic: ‘Old age has a great sense of peace and freedom. When the passions have lost their hold, you have escaped, as Sophocles says, not only from one mad master, but from many!’ Perhaps we also remember Isaac feeling old long before his death and being (Seemingly) hoodwinked by Rebecca and Jacob, described by the Midrash as “free from the Evil Inclination,” what Sophocles would describe as, “not only from one mad master, but from many!”

When the ancient Patriarchs were awakened by Jeremiah and heard the news of the destruction and exile, they rise up as in the days of old, but quickly age and experience, in the words of TS Eliot:

Let me disclose the gifts reserved for age

To set a crown upon your lifetime’s effort.

First, the cold friction of expiring sense

Without enchantment, offering no promise

But bitter tastelessness of shadow fruit

As body and soul begin to fall asunder.

Second, the conscious impotence of rage

At human folly, and the laceration

Of laughter at what ceases to amuse.

And last, the rending pain of reenactment

Of all that you have done, and been; the shame

Of motives late revealed, and the awareness

Of things ill done and done to others’ harm

Which once you took for exercise of virtue.

We observe this devastating aging process through the eyes of this Kinah, and begin to understand how Tisha b’Av can age us as well, suck away our energy; that the absence of the Temple leaves us, “Without enchantment, offering no promise – But bitter tastelessness of shadow fruit – As body and soul begin to fall asunder.”  Without a Temple we experience, “the rending pain of reenactment – Of all that you have done, and been; the shame – Of motives late revealed, and the awareness – Of things ill done and done to others’ harm – Which once you took for exercise of virtue.” (“The Cosmic Effect”)

When we cease to experience that our actions matter – that we can make a difference, large or small – we age. When we live like that, we suck out the spiritual breath of the world, even that inhaled by the Patriarchs.

Jeremiah goes to the Patriarchs and pleads with them to pray, to reenergize the world with their prayer, even as their descendants experience a loss of meaning.

I believe that this is why we pray our regular prayers even on the day when the Heavens are shut to them; we are attempting to nurture positive spiritual energy even as we mourn. It is our statement that we do not accept mourning as a state of being, certainly not one we will not fight.

Yesterday, someone emailed the following question: “do you think we are mourning the absence of the temple, or the absence of what we need to be in order to merit having the temple?”

My answer was, “Definitely the latter.” We are mourning our inability to connect to the Covenant Between The Pieces-Kinah 12. We age, in the negative way, when we lose that connection, so we turn, as did Jeremiah, to the Patriarchs and join them in prayer. By joining their prayers, we join in God’s. We don’t have to die, as in Sack’s words, “in the harness” before first living in it!

 

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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8
Jul

Kinot-Links to Essays Related to Day Kinot 15-50

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Music of Halacha, Prayer, Reflections & Observations, Spiritual Growth

The Foundation Stone has a complete commentary on the Kinot on our website and Blog – Click on the Kinot Tab on the bottom right. However, not all essays on Kinot are listed as such. Below are essays pertinent to Kinot:

Kinah 15:

The Music of Halacha-Kashering,” Experiencing God’s wrath as a form of Kashering.

Kinah 16

Tehillim Tools-The Three Weeks-108:11.”

Kohen & Navi Murdered: A recurring theme in Kinot

Shekalim-Historical Background I, II-Yehu Avenges Navot, III-AthaliahIV-Yehu’s FailureV-The Vineyard of Naboth.

Shekalim-Reading The Text I-God’s Message To Renew the Covenant, II-The Form of the Covenant, III-The Form of the Covenant II, IV-Step By Step, V-The Seeds of Destruction, VI, VII-A Limited Vision.

Biblical Personalities-Yoash

Kinah 17:

The Voice of Torah-Kinot.”

The Story of Bar Kochva In The Midrash.”

The Psalm of Exile I.”

Drops of Light II.”

Kinah 18:

Tehillim Tools-Three Weeks-106:4-5.” Our response to “I will be exceedingly good to you.”

The Second Haftarah of Consolation-Confrontation.”

Outsiders.”

The Light In The Dark.”

Abraham the Builder,”A Chamber for the Shechinah,” “Reconnecting to the Heavenly Throne,” & “A Higher Vocabulary,” related to, “You are holy, enthroned by the praises of the holy.”

Kinah 19:

Mitzvah Planters.”

Jonah: Clarity and Confusion.”

Inspiring Good.”

Al Regel Achat-Double Comfort.”

A Life Without Shame.”

Kinah 21: The Ten Martyrs:

Mishlei Tools 11:30-Sources of Life.”

Kinah 22: Be Quiet, allow me to speak.

Hear Our Voices.”

Captions: Reading The Kinot.”

Kinah 25

Languages of Exile.”

The Music of Halacha-Kinah 25-Crying 1.”

The Music of Halacha-Kinah 25-Crying 2.”

My Eyes Are Dry.”

Kinah 26: Jeremiah’s Journey To The Patriarchs

The Long Walk.”

Kinah 27: Jeremiah’s Vision:

Nightmares.”

Kinah 31: Leaving Egypt-Leaving Jerusalem (Usually sung, alternating between joyous and sad tunes, concluding with a joyous song of hope.

Shall We Dance.”

Singing Through The Three Weeks.”

Conspicuous As Waves.”

Exile In Our Blood.”

Singing Despite.”

Travels in Exile.”

Doing Away With The Trappings III.”

Kinah 33: To Stir Elegy

Akeidat Yitzchak-Fasting Tools.”

Forms of Mourning-Serving A Purpose.”

The Maharam miRottenberg.”

Kinah 41: Inquire, consumed in fire:

Mayim Yechezkel-As A Sacrifice.”

Kinah 45: Keili Tzion

Lost Opportunities.”

Haftarah of Consolation 4.”

Mitzvah 138-Concept 398.”

Empty Spaces.”

As Dreamers.”

The Things I Miss.”

Kinah 46 is the same as Kinah 4-Evening Kinot

Holocaust Kinot-Kinot 47-50:

Our Weapon in the Battle of Good and Evil.”

Travels in Exile II.”

There Are Tears In Things.”

The Pieta and The Pear.”

A Dress For My Child.”

Learning Hope.”

Our Story.”

Strangers In The World.”

3 Stories From Simon Huberband.”

A Reading of Joel 2:12-14.”

A Movie Like No Other.”

Hitler’s Children.”

The Klausenberger Rebbe’s Faith.”

Isaac Katzenelson-The Song of The Murdered Jewish People.”

Under the Tattoo.”

Author Info:

Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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8
Jul

Kinot-Links to Essays Related to Day Kinot 6-14

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

The Foundation Stone has a complete commentary on the Kinot on our website and Blog – Click on the Kinot Tab on the bottom right. However, not all essays on Kinot are listed as such. Below are essays pertinent to Kinot:

Kinah 6:

Planning My Revenge.”

Clinging To The Past,” related to “The Enemy’s Percussion.”

 

Kinah 7:

The Four Questions of Tisha b’Av.”

Finding The Place to Pray,” related to, “The Assembly place You designated for Your followers.”

Three Weeks Of…”

Tehillim-137:2,” as related to, “Remember God what happened to us.”

Kinah 8:

Between Hope & Despair,”Abundance,” “Tehillim Tools-116:3,” “Possibility Gatherers,” related to, “Waiting to Die.”

Lacking Or Desire,” related to,  “My laments soar to Heaven.”

Kinah 9:

Pirkei Avot-Chodesh Av-Clarity.”

Growing Wings.”

Kinah 10:

Sitting on the Ground.”

An Extraordinary City.”

Damaged Diamond.”

True Wealth.”

Body Language,” related to the phrase, “And the song of the Ark bearers, silenced.”

Mishlei Tools-The Three Weeks-19:17-A Race With God.” “Catching The Moments of Truth, “ “Loving Others,” Even in tragedy we remained the Rose of Sharon.

Spiritual Tools-The Greatest Power One & Two.”

Kinah 11-Yoshiyahu:

The Measure of Righteousness.”

A Renewed Covenant.”

“Jeremiah-Historical Background V VI, VII.”

Countdown to Pesach 23.”

Kinah 12-My Tent

Psalm 27-Intensity.”

In God’s House.”

What We Have Accomplished.”

The Cosmic Effect.”

Succot-Sh’mini Atzeret-Water: Water & Creation.”

Kinah 13: Where is Your Love?:

Shema-Kavanot-Satisfied With Us.”

Amidah-Kavanot-Modim.” “Empowerment-Breslav.”

Prayer Tools-Breslav-Find Your Piety.”

Pesukei d’Zimrah-Kavanot for the Three Weeks-Ashrei” – Asking Ourselves

Elijah’s Vision,” Finding the “Koh”

Forms of Mourning-Kinah III-The Beginning and the End,” – “He looked this way and that.”

Kinah 14:

The Spectator & The Agent.”

Olat Shabbat-Responding To Tragedy.”

Travel to Alternative Universes- What If?”

Psalm 137-The Psalm of Exile I.”

Author Info:

Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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8
Jul

Kinot-Links to Essays Related to Evening Kinot

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Relationships, Spiritual Growth

The Foundation Stone has a complete commentary on the Kinot on our website and Blog – Click on the Kinot Tab on the bottom right. However, not all essays on Kinot are listed as such. Below are essays pertinent to Kinot:

Introduction to Kinot:

Blessings-Birchat haMazon-Kavanot for the Three Weeks – This is related to “The Futility of Our Words.”

The True Genius of the Jewish People,” related to “Poetic Souls.”

History As An Artichoke.”

Shared Journeys – Being There.”

Eavesdropping.”

Kinah 1:

Forms of Mourning-Misped & Sackcloth III – The Eventual Dance,”Forms of Mourning-Kinah-The Unheard Lament,” explaining how our mourning, even when the world seems relatively stable, helps us gain perspective.

The Root of a Decision.”

Tehillim Tools-The Three Weeks-119:39.”

Pirkei Avot-Three Weeks-Teachers.”

Reasons-Joyful Mourning.”

Spiritual Tools-Three Weeks-Sensitivity,” “Spiritual Tools-Honoring Intentions,” “The Price of Relationships,” on the theme of Sinat Chinam.

Chodesh Av-Connections,” on the theme of, “We were orphans, our mothers, like widows.”

Biblical Personalities-The Three Weeks-Moshe’s Empathy,” and “Tehillim Tools-Loving Others By Using Your Talents,” And “Hotline For The Displaced,” on Sinat Chinam, and,  “They distorted the judgment of the orphan and the widow.”

Spiritual Tools-Three Weeks-Torah Study,” related to, “The Crown of Our Head Has Fallen.”

Spiritual Tools-Three Weeks-Murder!”

Tolerating Being Loved,” connected to the penultimate verse: “For truly You have rejected us, bitterly raged against us (Lamentations 5:22).”

Kinah 3-Crying:

Forms of Mourning-Disconnected From My Light.”

Forms of Mourning-Fasting I – How We Eat.”

Forms of Mourning-The Eventual Dance

Forms of Mourning-Crying-Together.”

Forms of Mourning-Crying-Opening The Constraints.”

Forms of Mourning-Crying-A Directed Cry For Direction.”

Forms of Mourning-Lamenting With God.”

Kinah 4-Shomron & Yerushalayim:

The debate between Shomron & Yerushalayim are at the root of Sinat Chinam: “Spiritual Tools-Loving Others-As Wolves,” “Loving Others,” “Honoring the Mourners,”

Kinah 5: Concluding the Evening Kinot:

Becoming Illuminators,” related to: “And once more illuminate the populous city with the light of Your Splendor.”

Daniel-12:3-Inspiring Good.”

Fasting For the Eternal.”

Amidah-Kavanot-Three Weeks-Jerusalem.”

Demanding of God.”

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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