‘613 Concepts’ Category Archives

20
Jul

The Music of Halacha: Kashering

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Music of Halacha, Portion of the Week, What is the Reason?

Dear Rabbi Weinberg; I have heard you say on numerous occasions that the laws of Kashering are a guide to repairing spiritual damage. Since the laws of Kashering are in this week’s Parsha, Matos, “Everything that comes into fire, you shall pass through fire and it will be purified (Numbers 31:23),” I was wondering where you got such an idea that I never heard in Yeshiva or from my rabbeim. How can you teach an idea which has no Mesorah/Tradition? YG

Dear YG;

I do have a Mesorah as do you:

“It is a matter that is clear and revealed that the laws of impurities and purity are biblical decrees. They are not among the ideas that a person’s logic will derive. and they are included in the category of, “Chukim,” statutes, as are the laws of immersion to be purified; for impurity is not mud or waste that are removed by water, but a biblical decree, and the matter depends on one’s intention. Therefore our Sages taught that one who immerses in a Mikvah that lacks an established status as a Kosher mikvah, is considered to not have immersed.

Even so, there is a lesson hinted in these laws that one who has intention to purify himself is purified once he has immersed even though he did not affect any physical changes. So too, one who intends to purify his soul from spiritual impurities, such as wicked thoughts and destructive ideas; once he has committed himself to separate from such ideas and immerses himself in the purifying waters of pure knowledge, of him the verse says, ‘Then I will sprinkle pure water upon you, that you may become cleansed; I will cleanse you from all your contamination and from all your idols (Ezekiel 36:25)’ [Rambam: Conclusion of Hilchot Mikva’ot].”

Many commentators wonder why the Rambam only mentions Teshuvah from destructive thoughts and not the purification of Teshuvah from all sins, and why the Rambam does not address the idea of immersion in the pure waters of Torah as part of every Teshuva.

The Beit HaLevi (Lecture 15) teaches that beyond the punishment that results from the sin of violating the Divine Will, the sinner has damaged more than one level of his higher soul, and has dulled his heart as is taught in the Talmud (Yomah 39a).

He continues, “We find that the impurity of the sin follows him around as a dog follows his master (Avodah Zarah 5b), and, our Sages have taught that the sin clasps onto him and precedes him into the Heavenly Tribunal on the day of his final judgment, as Ezekiel says, ‘For their iniquities remain upon them (32:27).

“When the person comes to do Teshuvah, besides that he needs atonement to negate the punishment, he must purify himself and repair the spiritual damage he caused his soul. and remove the blocks he has placed over his heart, as the verse teaches, ‘You shall cut away the barrier of your heart (Devarim 10:16).’

“When he has gone through the tree steps of Teshuva, which are total regret over the past, resolving to not again sin in the future, and the Vidui, immediately the impurity of the sin is removed from the surface of his soul, and he remains as a vessel without anything non-kosher on the surface, but still has impurity absorbed into the inside of the vessel.

“This is true on two levels: One, the habit of sinning has changed the essence of his soul and makes it easier to again sin, and two, the impurity of the sin as like something non-kosher that has been absorbed into a pot and must be kashered as the same heat at which it absorbed the non-kosher. The pot must first be rinsed of any surface non-kosher before it is kashered at the appropriate temperature.

“This is the idea taught by the Talmud, ‘When the serpent came upon Eve he injected a lust into her (Shabbat 146a),’ the same lust for sin that is injected deep into our souls each time we sin; a lust that corrupts our soul and empowers our physical side to overcome our spiritual nature, without any negative external influence to sin. The next sin will come from within. This is what needs to be Kashered, as the verse says, ‘Everything that comes into fire, you shall pass through fire and it will be purified.’

Nothing Kashers as does Torah study, as the Mishna teaches, “Whoever engages in Torah study for its own sake…‘machsharto, it makes him fit to be righteous (Avot 6:1),’ ‘machsharto’ as in Kashers him, after Teshuvah to remove the impurities absorbed in his soul and the barriers to his heart (Beit HaLevi; Derush #15).”

This is why the Rambam focuses on ‘one who intends to purify his soul from spiritual impurities, such as wicked thoughts and destructive ideas,’ for it is such sins that are the most difficult to Kasher.

My father zt”l taught me that the heat/passion/intensity at which the negative influence was absorbed determines the necessary heat /passion/intensity to burn out the evil.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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20
Jul

Planning My Revenge

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Portion of the Week

At Least in the Planning

(Summer 1992) I went to pick up Oriel who attended camp only until 1PM, and noticed that his older brother Betzalel was sulking. I ran over to hug him and ask what was wrong. He told me that one of the counselors had said something cruel to him and he was hurt and very angry. I informed the camp that I was taking Betzalel out early, dropped Oriel at home and took Betzalel to a novelty store.

“We’re going to make a Havdalah set for that counselor,” I told Betzalel.

“I don’t want to give a gift to him,” my son insisted.

“Don’t worry,” I assured him, “you’ll want to give this one to him!”

We bought a

Joy Buzzer

joy buzzer to place on the bottom of the cup, and wound it up to shock the mean counselor when he picked up his cup to begin Havdalah. We also put

Invisible Ink Powder

invisible ink powder all over the cup so that his hands would be stained for a few days after touching the cup. We bought

Special Besamim

sneezing powder for Besamim, and

Our Havdalah Candle Gift

an exploding cigar as the candle.

We began to imagine the counselor’s reaction as he would be shocked by the buzzer, his hands stained, his sneezing over the Besamim and his shock when his candle exploded. Betzalel couldn’t stop laughing.

“So,” I asked, “do you want to stop at the camp on the way home to present his gift?”

“No,” he said, “I already feel much better. I don’t need to do it. I don’t want to do something so mean. Let’s through the ‘set’ out!”

“Okay,” I said, “but we should through it out to fulfill a Mitzvah. Do you know which one?”

Betzalel, who was working on memorizing all 613 with me, quickly responded, “You shouldn’t take revenge.”

“Great! Anything else?” I asked.

“You shouldn’t bear a grudge.”

“Fantastic! Anything else?”

“You shouldn’t hate someone in your heart.”

We repeated the three Mitzvot and tossed the special Havdalah set into the trash.

On the way home, we discussed how he was able to express his anger without taking revenge.

My father zt”l called me a few days later: “Betzalel called to ask me a question about you!” he chuckled. “He told me about the Havdalah set and your discussion about revenge, but he had a problem; he overheard you quoting the Ohr HaChaim HaKadosh (whose yahrtzeit is on the 15th of Tammuz) on, “Avenge the Children of Israel (Numbers 31:2),” that there are two possible approaches to vengeance; one, the planning, and two, the actual war. Betzalel is concerned that even your planning revenge against the counselor was revenge and he called me to ask about it.”

My heart was in my throat as I wondered whether my father would argue that I had violated the Mitzvah, even as it was pumped with pride over my son’s question, caring, and sensitivity in asking my father rather than me.

“I told him that intention matters and that your intention was for him to throw out the Havdalah set. I assured him that you followed the Torah each step of the way.”

“But,” he continued, “how did you come up with such a brilliant strategy?”

“I was raised by my father!”

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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26
Jun

Gift Wrapped

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Prayer

In honor of S.S.: “Bind them as a sign upon your arm and let them be Totafot between your eyes. And write them on the doorposts of your house and upon your gates (Devarim 6:8-9).”

It is difficult for me to find a gift for my wife; her tastes are measured by “her country,” not Yeshiva Lane. I have been successful from time to time only to confront an even greater challenge: wrapping the gift. I found a website that guides you in the actual wrapping, but I’m having a challenge with the bow. I spent more time tying and retying the ribbon than I did choosing the gift. The card is ready. The paper is (almost) perfectly folded, but I can’t get the bow just right. Is it as important as the gift? No, but Debbie is familiar with my artistic limitations and a bow tied perfectly by me would reflect the enormous effort in presenting the gift.

I finally decided to leave the bow askew because it would be proof that I, not a professional, wrapped the gift. The bow and paper will last only for the moment it takes my wife to read the card, and then she’ll rip it all apart, but the wrapping is a sign of the care that went into the presentation of the gift.

I wrap a present six days a week. I tie a knot that will not last long past my prayers. The way I tie the knot is a sign of how much care I put into wrapping my “gift,” my whole heart, all my feelings, dedicated to God.

I watch as people mechanically wrap their Tefillin each morning. They are as skilled as the professional gift-wrappers, but I remember that the Mitzvah is the tying. I am tying up my gift. It will be unwrapped when I finish praying. The special connection of that moment when I present the gift will physically pass, but the sign, the care I put into tying the knot, will echo throughout the day.

Permanently? No, but then it is a sign, not permanent like a tattoo, but a sign of where my heart is at this moment.

When I realize how much I care about the presentation of my “gift,” how my entire heart is focused on God, I slide my shirt sleeve over the sign; it is personal and intimate. A powerful sign that I cannot violate by allowing others to see.

That moment of intimacy allows me to take all the different compartments, Totafot, of my mind; the ones that are focused on paying my bills, personal issues, questions etc. and point them all in one direction, at least while I pray. The compartments are unified by my passion for connection to God.

The gift wrap, the bow, my feelings, unifying the compartments…all dependent on my prayer. I want it to last. I desire that powerful connection to last and define my day, so I want my home to reflect that passion. I look at m home as the carefully considered gift that needs the perfect wrapping, even with an imperfect bow. I want to preserve the gift and its wrapping, so I inscribe this feeling on every part of my home, and I walk within my wrapped gift, and find that I can live my life as a gift: This particular gift; the one I wrapped this morning.

Author Info:

Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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16
Jun

The Great Balancers

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Portion of the Week

Daniel Kahneman, the 2002 Nobel Laureate in Economics is a psychologist, not an economist. He was lecturing to a group of Israeli air force flight instructors on the conventional wisdom of behavior modification and its application to the psychology of flight training. Kahenman drove home the point that rewarding positive behavior works but punishing mistakes does not. One of his students interrupted, voicing an opinion that would lead Kahenman to an epiphany and guide his research for decades.

“I’ve often praised people warmly for beautifully executed maneuvers, and the next time they always do worse,” the flight instructor said. “And I’ve creamed at people for badly executed maneuvers, and by and large the next time they improve. Don’t tell me that reward works and punishment doesn’t work. My experience contradicts it.” The other flight instructors agreed.

To Kahenman the flight instructors’ experiences rang true. On the other hand, Kahenman believed in the animal experiments that demonstrated that reward works better than punishment. He ruminated on this apparent paradox. And then it struck him: the screaming preceded the improvement, but contrary to appearances it did not cause it.

How can that be? The answer lies in a phenomenon called regression toward the mean. That is, in any series of random events an extraordinary event is most likely to be followed, due purely to chance, by a more ordinary one.

Here’s how it works: The student pilots all had a certain personal ability to fly fighter planes. Raising their skill level involved many factors and required extensive practice, so although their skill was slowly improving, the change wouldn’t be noticeable from one maneuver to the next. Whether the instructor complimented the student or yelled, the next maneuver was going to be closer to his average skill. If the previous maneuver was spectacular, the following flight would seem worse. If the maneuver was terrible, the next flight would, as closer to average, seem better.

The responses of God, Moshe, Calev and Joshua to the Ten Spies and the reaction of the people, make me reflect on what was the intended effect of each response. The people had fluctuated between the greatness of Revelation and the construction of the Mishkan and the low points of all their complaints, especially their response to the spies’ report. Some people immediately tried to regain their former heights and simply went forward on their own, only to be quickly defeated.

The people had never found their mean, their balance point, or, their “average.”

Perhaps that is why the portion concludes with Tzitzit: They are intended to be “Balancers” between our highest and lowest points. They serve to remind us of our greatness especially when we have fallen, and when we surge upward, we recall that they are “garments,” external, still to be internalized.

Author Info: 



Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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5
May

Train in the Distance

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Holidays, Portion of the Week

What is the point of this story

What information pertains

The thought that life could be better

Is woven indelibly

Into our hearts

And our brains

Paul Simon: Train in the Distance

The point of the story of the State of Israel, as is that of the story of the Jewish people, is that we live with the conviction that life can always be better. This is the idea of Israel and is woven indelibly into our hearts and our brains. Why else would we be so committed to attempting to make peace with people who have vowed to destroy us? How else could we possibly have become the “Start up Nation” even while in a constant state of war since the inception of the State? Life can always be better.

People have asked me how I can believe that Israel is the beginning of Redemption when it cannot possibly be considered a blessing to live under such constant threat? For me, the idea of Redemption, by which we have lived for more than two thosand years in the diaspora, is that life can always be better.

For me, the idea of Counting the Omer from Pesach to Shavuot is that life can always be better. We count forty-nine steps that we can climb to ascend to the heights of Sinai with the conviction that there is always something better at the top.

For me, when God asks only for fresh Showbread once each week even while sending fresh Manna every morning, He wants us to wait for tomorrow’s bread hoping that it will be even better than today’s.

For me, each of the appointed festivals that occur each year comes with the promise that this year’s festival will be better than any of the past.

For me, the Shabbat, which introduces this section of the festivals, is a promise that next week will be better than this.

For me, the sin of striking another human being includes a refusal to look at the person and believe that he can become a better human being. We cannot afford to look at any part of life or any human being without that thought that life can be better being woven indelibly into our hearts and our brains.

For us, the “Train” is never in the distance, but always just up ahead.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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2
May

Cheating

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Portion of the Week

Whenever I am asked for my predictions for the future I become irritable and think of Horace.

Horace, himself a poet, already confessed that he let many things pass rather than make an enemy of the irritable genus of poets; and poets, are irritable still.

Reading of the famous chess match between Karpov and Korchnoi in Baguio City, Phillipines, 1978, where they silently tore each other limb from limb, we realize that chess players and poets share the same irritability.

The adepts of the noble game claim that there are strong commonalities between poetry and chess: a game of chess, even if played by dilettantes, is an austere metaphor of life and a struggle for life. The chess player’s virtues, reason, memory and invention, are the virtues of every thinking man.

The stern rule of chess, according to which the piece that was touched must be moved, and it is not permissible to redo a move of which one repents, reproduces the inexorability of the choices of life.

A grandmaster will never cheat, and a poet, cannot. Yet, many of us attempt to cheat at the game of life. We want to know the future so that we can plan. We search for psychics, mystics, Tarot Card readers, Kabbalists, holy men and prophets, who can predict the future so we can play the game without having to resort to our reason, memory and invention.

“And the person who shall turn to the sorcery of the Ovot and the Yid’onim, to stray after them – I shall concentrate My attention upon that person and cut him off from among his people.” (Leviticus 20:6) God wants us to play the game without cheating. He wants us to place everything on the line when we make a choice.

All this in the portion of holiness, for there is no holiness in cheating, only in playing the game.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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22
Apr

Still Growing Up

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Reflections & Observations

“The majority of poems one outgrows and outlives, as one outgrows and outlives the majority of human passions: Dante’s is one of those which one can only just hope to grow up to at the end of his life (T. S. Eliot).”

The Haggadah has changed for me from the basic children’s story of my childhood, to a sophisticated perspective of Jewish history and applying its lessons, as did the Rabbis in Bnei Brak, to our times. I have outgrown the Haggadah of my childhood, and find that it is the perfect indicator of how much I have developed since the previous Pesach.

There is one constant: No matter how profound its lessons, I still aspire to be able to read it as did my father zt”l. We would all come to the Seder armed with ideas, questions, and explanations, but our father would read the words with such simple beauty that he answered all our questions just with his reading. (This was true of the way he read everything; a verse, Gemara, Rashi, Rambam, or Halacha; he saw in the basic text far beyond all the commentaries.) I hope to grow up to his reading of the Haggadah by the end of my life.

This year I understood that it is not only my reading of the Haggadah that indicates my growth, but the aspiration of my reading; the deeper my understanding, the more I appreciate my father’s clarity, and the more I aspire to grow up to read as did he.

There is a bittersweet quality to such aspiration; Almost twelve years after his death, I am still discovering more of his greatness. I realize that, although I revered him while he was alive; I revere him far more now, and I am pained that I did not have such reverence while he was alive. My father is still teaching me, touching me, guiding me. So, while most others outgrow their desire to be like their fathers, I hope to grow up to be like him by the end of my life.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Mar

The Patience of a Sheep

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Holidays, Portion of the Week

I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and

self-contain’d,

I stand and look at them long and long.

They do not sweat and whine about their condition,

They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins,

They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God,

Not one is dissatisfied, not one is demented with the mania of

owning things,

Not one kneels to another, nor to his kind that lived thousands of

years ago,

Not one is respectable or unhappy over the whole earth.

”Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman

It was clear to them that God could take them out of Egypt in an instant, but for some reason, He had chosen to take His time. The Plagues had already lasted more than six months. Six months of no work. Six months of no abuse. Six months of self respect. Six months of not knowing what was next. They were becoming impatient.

Finally, Moshe summoned them, and began to speak. It was his first speech to them since they stormed away from him after his first meeting with Pharaoh and things got worse. He had tried to speak, but the people were too exhausted from their increased work load to even listen to him. Things were different now. They were willing to listen. Most of all, they wanted to know what was next. They were impatient.

Moshe presented the laws of Passover and the Pesach Offering. He instructed them to take the animal on the Tenth day of the month and and wait until the 14th. Most understood that this simple act was a declaration of Spiritual war with the Egyptians who worshipped these animals as gods. The Children of Israel were going to fearlessly slaughter the Egyptian gods in front of their former masters, and the Egyptians were helpless to stop it.  People understood the point. Perhaps they even appreciated it, but, “five more days?” More waiting? They were impatient.

Except, that is, for one child staring out the window from morning till night at the sheep in its pen in front of the house. He couldn’t stop staring.

His parents were initially pleased. He was staying out of their way and, unusual for him, wasn’t causing any trouble. By the third day; they were concerned. Television would be better. Wii would be okay. But a sheep! How can someone stare at a sheep all day for three days?

“I love watching how peaceful they are,” he said in response to their question, “everyone  is nervous, agitated and impatient, but the sheep is perfectly content, placid and patient. I wish you guys could be like that even for just a few minutes!”

His parents joined him on the couch, staring out the window at the sheep. They felt themselves relax. The kid had a point.

Pesach is Pesach. The adults could not afford to sheep watch all day. They had to clean the house, prepare for the guests, and pack everything they wanted to take with them on their journey. Back to work it was! They were too busy to be impatient.

Pesach began. They offered their Pesach sacrifice. They rushed through the meal. They finished and began to hear the screams from the Egyptian neighborhoods. They were waiting. They were impatient again. That is, except for a little boy and his parents who had learned patience from the sheep in the yard.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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28
Mar

The Consolation of the Stars

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Portion of the Week

“His mother had often taken him out after dark and shown him the sky. On such occasions her weary face would break into a smile. The stars provided some consolation for the hard life she led. She normally lived with her face pointed down to the ground, which embraced her rice plants as if it were waiting for her to join them there one of these days. When she gazed up at the stars, just for a brief while, she didn’t need to look at the brown earth beneath her.” (“The Man From Beijing” by Henning Mankell, p.89)

I imagine that the slaves in Egypt had a similar experience of consolation when they looked up at the stars after a day of laboring for Pharaoh on the brown earth of Egypt. The night sky was a way of looking up, not down. It was an escape from the earth that was waiting for their bodies.

And then came the commandment, the first to the people as a nation, the Mitzvah of Kiddush HaChodesh, the Sanctification of the New Moon. Looking up at the sky would no longer be an escape, but a call. It would no longer be a consolation, but a challenge. It was no longer a far away distant place where there is no suffering, but an immediate presence in their lives.

God made them the masters of the heavens, and they began to taste the possibilities of freedom.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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24
Mar

Insects and Manna

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in 613 Concepts, Portion of the Week

In his book, “Insects as Human Food,” Dr F. S. Bodenheimer, professor of zoology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, describes his efforts to identify the biblical manna. Some scholars have thought that it was a lichen, Lecanora esculenta, which grows on rocks in many parts of the Middle East, producing pea-sized fruiting bodies that are prized as sweet delicacies. These fruiting bodies are light enough to be blown about, so they could conceivably form a manna rain. But it would be a unique event, and the Bible reports a regular appearance of the manna every morning. Furthermore, no one has ever found this lichen in the Sinai region.

There are, on the other hand, may reports from travelers in the Sinai region of a “manna” associated with tamarisk thickets. This granular, sweet manna appears every year for a period of some weeks in June, although it varies greatly in abundance from year to year. It has generally been assumed to be a secretion of the tamarisk itself, but Dr Bodenheimer, who visited the Sinai to study this “manna,” found that it was the product of two species of scale insects living on the tamarisk shrubs. His argument that this insect is the source of the biblical manna convinced Marston Bates, one of my favorite essayists, and who almost destroyed his marriage by his insistence that all his guests and his wife sample all sorts of tasty insects. Dr Bates believes that this is why the Torah allows us to eat certain insects; to acknowledge their role in producing manna!

I hope both Drs Bodenheimer and Bates are wrong! Their theory kind of ruins my appetite for manna, and that, I believe, is exactly why the Torah allows us to eat certain grasshoppers!

As my wife will attest, as will every person who has ever cooked for me, I am a finicky eater. Debbie, as I was writing the first paragraph above, brought me a plate of gluten free polenta, “which,” she said, “is similar to foccacia,” (I never heard of polenta or foccacia before!)transformed into a slice of pizza. The problem is that it has a huge mushroom on top. Yuk! What shall I do? What’s worse; a grasshopper or a mushroom? But, here I am, writing about the Torah teaching us to overcome such (refined) tastes; so, here I go… (I’m removing the mushroom)

The Torah pushes us to overcome our initial reactions to things; to take a second look, to experience all we are permitted, to enjoy God’s creation, even polenta.

I’ll stay away from grasshoppers, but I will take a second bite of this “pizza,” Yuum….

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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