June, 2013 Archives

30
Jun

Kinah 6-The Enemy’s Percussion

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

“My foes applauded while my limbs drooped.” That clapping reminded me of a lecture I recently watched:

Evelyn Glennie, a deaf percussion musician, describes mastering her abilities, as “So all of my performances are based on entirely what I experience, and not by learning a piece of music, putting on someone else’s interpretation of it, buying all the CDs possible of that particular piece of music, and so on and so forth. Because that isn’t giving me enough of something that is so raw and so basic, and something that I can fully experience the journey of.. But it’s meant that acousticians have had to really think about the types of halls they put together. There are so few halls in this world that actually have very good acoustics, dare I say. But by that I mean where you can absolutely do anything you imagine. The tiniest, softest, softest sound to something that is so broad, so huge, so incredible!”

She then had the audience clap, “If I asked you to clap — maybe I can do this. If I can just say, “Please clap and create the sound of thunder.” I’m assuming we’ve all experienced thunder. Now, I don’t mean just the sound; I mean really listen to that thunder within yourselves. And please try to create that through your clapping.”

I suspect that when our enemies clapped it was worse than seeing someone rejoice and laugh at our fall; they turned their laughter into a form of music. Perhaps they made thunder to scare us, or perhaps it was the sound of a simple rainfall.

We had lost our music with the destruction of the Temple. We would no longer hear the beautiful music during the Temple service.

We had lost the music of our prayers; God covered the heavens with clouds to stop our prayers (Lamentations 3:44). The music of the clapping was devastating; our world was silent.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Jun

Kinah 4-Salieri & Mozart

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

Salieri: Men say there is no justice upon earth.

But neither is there justice in the heavens!

That’s clear to me as any simple scale.

For I was born with a great love for art:

When – still a child – I heard the organ peal

Its lofty measures through our ancient church,

I listened all attention – and sweet tears,

Suite and involuntary tears would flow.

Though young, I spurned all frivolous pursuits:

All studies else than music were to me

Repugnant; and with stubborn arrogance

I turned from them to dedicate myself

To music only. Hard is the first step

And tiresome the first journey. I overcame

Early discomfitures; and craftsmanship

I set up as a pedestal for art;

Only then, tested and proved in science,

I ventured to indulge creative fancy. I started to create, but secretly,

Not daring yet even to dream of glory.

At last fame deigned

To smile on me; and in the hearts of men

I found an echo to my own creation.

Then I was happy, and enjoyed in peace

My labors, my success, my fame

My fellow workers in the art divine.

But now, myself I say it, now

I do know envy! Yes, Salieri envies,

Deeply, in anguish envies, O ye Heavens!

Where, where is justice, when the sacred gift,

When deathless genius comes not to reward

Perfervid love and utter self-denial,

And toils and strivings and beseeching prayers,

But puts her halo round a lackwit’s skull,

A frivolous idler’s brow? O Mozart, Mozart!

(Aleksandr Pushkin, ‘Mozart and Salieri’)

Ezekiel, Chapter 23, depicts the kingdoms of the Ten Tribes and of Judah as to unfaithful wives, Ohola and Oholiva – Her Tent and Her Tent Is In Her – Samaria, the capital of the Ten Tribes, was constructed as a replica of Jerusalem with her temple, but the real Temple was not there. It was in Jerusalem, the capital of Judah, in which Her Tent, the Temple, stood.

I read this Kinah, this conversation between Jerusalem and Samaria, through the eyes of Pushkin’s description of the conversations between Salieri and Mozart:

Mozart: The merest trifle. One night lately,

As I was tossing on my sleepless bed,

Into my head came two or three ideas.

Today I wrote them down, and I should like

To hear your comments on them; but at present

You can’t attend to me.

Salieri listens to what Mozart described as a “merest trifle.”

Salieri: If he lives on, then all of us will perish-

High priests and servants of the art of music-

Not I alone with my overshadowed glory.

And what will it avail if Mozart live

And scale still higher summits of perfection?

Will he thereby raise art itself? No, no,

‘Twill fall again, when once he disappears.

He will not leave a single heir behind.

Then what can he avail us? Like a cherub

He brings to us some songs of paradise,

And awakens in us children of the dust

A wingless longing, then he flies away!

Imagine the people of Samaria looking toward Jerusalem and wondering I what merit did they have God’s Temple in their midst. Why did a relatively insignificant city such as Jerusalem have the privilege of the Holy Temple at its center? Did the Temple change the inhabitants of Jerusalem? Did it make a mark on them? Did it leave a mark on the people of Judah? How can we look to such greatness without understanding its place in our normal lives?

How did the people of Jerusalem respond when hearing such laments from Samaria? Did they know how to respond to these questions?

Do we?

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Jun

Introduction to Kinot-Poetic Souls

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

Genius: Range of mind, power of imagination, and responsiveness of soul; this is genius. The man of genius has a soul with greater range, can therefore be struck by the feelings of all beings, is concerned with everything in nature, and never receives an idea that does not evoke a feeling. Everything stirs him and everything is retained within him.

When the soul has been moved by an object itself, it is even more affected by the memory of the object. But in a man of genius, imagination goes further: it recalls ideas with a more vivid feeling than it receives them, because to these ideas are connected a thousand others more appropriate to arouse the feeling.

The genius surrounded with objects that preoccupy him does not remember; he sees but does not restrict himself to seeing; he is moved; and in the silence and obscurity of his room he enjoys the smiling and fertile countryside; he is chilled by the whistling of the winds; he is burned by the sun; he is frightened of storms. The soul often takes pleasure in these momentary affections; they give him enjoyment that is precious to him. The soul gives itself to everything that can increase its scope; with true colors and indelible strokes it would like to give body to the phantasms that are its work, that transport or amuse it. (Jean-Francois de Saint-Lambert, ‘Encyclopedie).”

The recitation and study of the Kinot, composed by such genius demands of us that we use the highest genius of our souls, our Poetic Souls, to go beyond the black and white words, and travel through space and time to all the communities described, imagining ourselves being there and gaining insight into this complex relationship between God and Israel.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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