October, 2012 Archives

5
Oct

Joseph The Builder

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

I was happy that Joseph’s visit was scheduled for a Shabbat meal this year; what could be a better way to greet the Viceroy of Egypt! He was a man who managed huge construction projects, building enough storehouses to feed Egypt for seven years, and I didn’t want him to turn a professional eye on my physically insignificant building.

Our Succah may not be fit for royalty, although I believe it is, (after all, it is Shabbat), but it would surely remind him of the booths in which he sat as he traveled back and forth to Canaan to bury his father.

It’s only been a year since his last visit but I wanted this visit to my Succah to be as exciting for him as when he ran to greet Jacob after twenty-two years apart.

I had to think of an invitation song as elaborate as what l sing to the angels who accompany me home from synagogue. I decided to welcome them before inviting Joseph because they would be as excited as I to see him; I hoped they wouldn’t monopolize the conversation.

I decided to invite him as he was when he was lifted from his prison pit, shaved and dressed for his first meeting with Pharaoh; “I invite you to join me in my Succah, a place where you can make more of a difference than you do in Heaven.”

A man dressed in royal robes appeared  and asked, “How can I make a difference in your Succah?”

I didn’t know whether I was supposed to bow, but with my family, guests, the angels and Joseph, there was no room for me to do anything other than bow my head. “I want you to teach me how to store the blessings of this festival to use throughout the year.”

“Are you expecting a famine?”

“No, I’m not. I’m expecting the most expansive year of my life. You have experience planting seeds for the future and I want to take my experiences since Elul and plant them so they will grow.”

I couldn’t stop asking, “I know far too many people who are hurting, as desperate as were you when you were in prison. Teach us how to look forward with the same trust you had even in your worst moments.”

This was a conversation with Joseph and I wanted even more; “You were able to prepare the nation for all their years in Egypt. You saw the future and promised them they would be redeemed. We need such a vision as we watch the world crumble around us.”

“I want to know how you stood so confidently even as your brothers were fighting you every step of the way.”

I was a little nervous when Joseph began, “Your long speech reminds me of Judah’s just before I revealed my identity.”

My visitor must have sensed my tension, “I responded to his speech by revealing my identity, so I guess you could describe it as successful. It was only at that moment that any of the brothers spoke to me with confidence. They were hesitant until that moment; intimidated, not acting as the great people they were. A person who lives and speaks without a full connection to his essence lacks a solid Yesod, Foundation. I constantly knew what I wanted and where I was heading, more importantly, I knew that God was guiding me each step of the way, and that I had to adjust to what He was teaching me. I had a solid Foundation.”

Joseph was silent for a few moments and all of us were to intimidated to speak.

The Tzaddik spoke to all of us, “If you really want to join our Society of Builders, you must have a solid Foundation, a Foundation Stone, so to speak (sorry, but I couldn’t resist). You must know where you stand and what you want. Define your goals. Choose the experiences that resonate most deeply in your soul. Speak, write and teach with confidence in who you are. You will be able to overcome anything and will develop a clear vision of the future.”

The next second, he was gone.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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4
Oct

Aaron The Builder

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

Aaron’s is the first visit of the Seven Guests to which I look forward without any nerves. He was the one who would look at a petitioner bringing a Sin Offering with only love and respect, not judging the man for his sin, but seeing only the person who wanted to repair. I can face Aaron even in my jittery Succah knowing that he will see it as majestic, filled with Hod.

I want to form a special invitation to him, so I examine the moment when Moses invited him to assume his role as Kohen Gadol, completing the dedication of the Mishkan. I’m not sure it will work, but I sing out, playing on Leviticus 9:7, “Come near to my Succah and elevate it with your presence and bring atonement for us!”

It worked! Aaron appears with a huge smile on his face.

“A little dramatic, but a lovely invitation. I heard from your earlier visitors that you want to join The Society of Builders. Why did you invite a Kohen?”

“I invited you because it was only after you blessed the people that the Divine Fire appeared and completed the Mishkan. You were the one who completed the building.I invited you so you can teach me how to complete my Succah.”

“It looks a little shaky, but it’s kosher. Why do you think it’s incomplete?”

“Because, I am incomplete.”

“So was I when I blessed the people just before the Divine Fire appeared. I was certain that the fire had not appeared because of my sin with the Golden Calf. It was my moving forward in the service despite my feeling incomplete, the true power of Hod, that allowed me to, as you say, complete the building,” he said as he faded away.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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3
Oct

Moses The Builder

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

I’m sitting in my sukkah despite it being soaked; there’s no way I would miss a visit from Moses. I cleaned up as well as I could, after all, this is the man who supervised the construction of the Mishkan. He had the Ultimate Architect, an awesome foreman/artist in Betzalel, unlimited supplies, and a huge team of workers. I, well, suffice it to say that my sukkah was constructed by someone who still believes in the Maginot Line! I have all my excuses ready if my visitor will be disappointed in my construction project. I admit that I prefer to keep the conversation focused on the failings of my little sukkah than to be tested by Moses. So, here goes!

I sing my invitation to Moses, and he quickly appears, sits down, slowly looks around, stares up for a few moments at my s’chach, and, smiles. “I see that I did a good job,” he comments. I stare openmouthed at him, happy that he considers my sukkah a “good job,” but wondering why he would take credit for my Leaning Tower of Canvas.

I wait for our great teacher to speak. “You’re the one who believes that the Mishkan serves a greater purpose than the Temple in Jerusalem, are you not?”

“Yes, Rebbi, I am.”

“Why?”

“I believe that the Mishkan allows us to create holy spaces wherever we are; create a Temple environment even while in exile.”

“Exactly,” he says, “what I constructed, the Mishkan, is eternal, and it is what helped you create a holy space even in this horribly constructed sukkah! I can say, looking at your sukkah, that I did a good job.”

I smile.

“Rebbi, may I ask a question?”

“Of course.”

“How did Rebbi accomplish that sense of the eternal in the Mishkan?”

“When the project was finished I blessed the people in two ways: ‘May the pleasantness of my Master, our Lord, be upon us, and may He establish our handiwork for us (Psalm 90).’ I taught them to have God as a partner in every action so that He would find our handiwork as a source of pleasantness, or Nachas. I then blessed them, ‘May you always have the desire for God to dwell among you,’ it’s only a matter of how much you desire God’s Presence in everything you do.”

Moses gave me a serious look and asked, “What have you done that will have eternal effect?”

I stop smiling.

“I believe that I have taught people to think on their own, to study your Torah as if you are speaking directly to them.”

“You are building thinkers; the most significant building project of all. Do more.” And, he left.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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2
Oct

The Dance of Water & Earth-Baruch sh’Amar Succot Kavanot

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer

The Abudirham teaches that there are Ten defined blessings in this prayer, each corresponding to one of the Ten Statements with which God created the world. Since Rosh Hashanah we have been engaged in a constant dance between earth and water. “A man is formed from dust, and his end is in dust.” This not only describes our physical end in the grave, it also speaks of the creation of the Primal human being, Adam, who was formed from the earth.

“A mist rose from the earth and watered the whole surface of the soil. And God, the Lord, formed the man of dust from the ground (Genesis 2:6–7).” The Primal Man was formed from a mixture of dust and water. So, on Rosh Hashanah, after speaking of our evening in the earth, we march to a body of water to perform Tashlich; the ceremony in which we toss our sins into the water.

Immediately after Adam’s sin God said, “Cursed is the ground because of you (Genesis 3:17).” The earth is considered to have contributed to Adam’s sin! Adam was formed from the earth, and the earth is described as having already rebelled against God! When God commanded the earth on the Third Day of Creation to produce trees whose bark would be as edible as its fruit, the earth, it was protecting itself from people believing who would destroy the trees by eating the bark, did not obey God’s instructions, and did not produce trees with edible bark. The earth contained the first seeds of sin, and those seeds found their ways into Adam, who was formed from the earth.

When we perform Tashlich at the water, we are saying to God, had He formed us from water, rather than earth, we would not have sinned!

Succot is the holiday on which we went to the Holy Altar in the Temple, the Altar of Earth, which housed in it Earth from the very place where Adam was formed, and poured fresh water onto it to not only reenact the formation of Adam from a mixture of earth and water, but to say, had we been created only from water, we would not have sinned. It is a reenactment of the formation of Adam.

On Succot we go back to the very beginning of creation. Hence, we refer to Succot as Yom HaRishon, the First Day, the first day of Man’s existence, our opportunity to repair any damage caused to creation.

For more Festival Prayer Kavanot for Succot see TheFoundationStone.org, i-Pray, i-Rejoice-Festival Prayers.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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