March, 2012 Archives

31
Mar

Bikkurim-In Our Times

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer

“When you have entered the land God your Lord is giving you as an inheritance and have taken possession of it and settled in it, take some of the first-fruits of all that you produce from the soil of the land God your Lord is giving you and put them in a basket. Then go to the place God your Lord will choose as a dwelling for His Name and say to the kohen in office at the time, “I declare today to the God, your Lord that I have come to the land God swore to our ancestors to give us.”  The kohen shall take the basket from your hands and set it down in front of the altar of God, your Lord. Then you shall declare before God, your Lord: [The text we study as part of the Haggadah:] ‘My father was almost destroyed by an Aramean, and he went down into Egypt with a few people and lived there and became a great nation, powerful and numerous.  But the Egyptians mistreated us and made us suffer, subjecting us to harsh labor.  Then we cried out to God, the Lord of our ancestors, and God heard our voice and saw our misery, toil and oppression. So God brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm, with great terror and with signs and wonders. He brought us to this place and gave us this land, a land flowing with milk and honey; and now I bring the first=fruits of the soil that you, God, have given me.’ Place the basket before God, your Lord and bow down before him. Then you and the Levites and the foreigners residing among you shall rejoice in all the good things the God, your Lord, has given to you and your household (Deuteronomy 26:1-11).”

The director of Zaka being interviewed tells how on the way to Eretz Yisroel with the woman who has just lost her family, she says to him that she wants to give one last hug to her daughter so he brings her to the funeral home and she gives her daughter a hug and says to him “you’re from avodat hakodesh right?” “please say at the kotel that I brought my first fruits; that I brought the best of my children as a sacrifice”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Idwr9cZc-u8

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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30
Mar

Arguing with God-Haftarah Shabbat HaGadol

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Portion of the Week

“Your words have been harsh against Me, says God. Yet you say, what have we spoken against You? You have said, it is useless to serve God; what profit is it that we have kept His ordinance and that we have walked as mourners before the Lord of Hosts? So now we call the proud sinners with praise, for those who do wickedness are raised up; they have even tested God and been spared (Malachi 3:13–15).”

“What’s the use in serving God? No matter what we do, we still get abused; we don’t have anything, and we are prosperous!” These are their words even though they had just been relieved from seventy years of captivity and slavery!

King David describes his response to such arguments and complaints in Psalm 73:

This is what the wicked are like

always free of care, they go on amassing wealth.

Surely in vain I have kept my heart pure

and have washed my hands in innocence.

All day long I have been afflicted,

and every morning brings new punishments.


If I had spoken out like that,

I would have betrayed Your children.

When I tried to understand all this,

it troubled me deeply

till I entered the sanctuary of God;

then I understood their final destiny.

Surely You place them on slippery ground;

You cast them down to ruin.

How suddenly are they destroyed,

completely swept away by terrors!

They are like a dream when one awakes;

so You, My Master,

You will despise them as fantasies.

When my heart was grieved

and my spirit embittered,

I was senseless and ignorant;

I was a brute beast before You.

Yet I am always with You;

You hold me by my right hand.

You guide me with your counsel,

and with glory You will receive me.

Whom have I in heaven but You?

And earth has nothing I desire besides You.

My flesh and my heart may fail,

but the Lord is the strength of my heart

and my portion forever.

Those who are far from You will perish;

You destroy all who are unfaithful to You.

But as for me, it is good to be near God.

I have made My Master, the Lord God my refuge;

I will tell of all Your deeds.

Isaiah too, responded to such complaints:

“But now listen, Jacob, my servant,

Israel, whom I have chosen.

This is what God says—

He who made you, Who formed you in the womb,

and who will help you:

Do not be afraid, Jacob, my servant,

Jeshurun, whom I have chosen.

For I will pour water on the thirsty land,

and streams on the dry ground;

I will pour out my Spirit on your offspring,

and my blessing on your descendants.

They will spring up like grass in a meadow,

like poplar trees by flowing streams.

Some will say, ‘I belong to God’;

others will call themselves by the name of Jacob;

still others will write on their hand, ‘God’s,’

and will take the name Israel (Isaiah 44:1-5).”

Malachi continues his message by reminding us that each word we speak is recorded:

“Then those who feared God talked with each other, and God listened and heard. A scroll of remembrance was written in His presence concerning those who feared God and honored His name.

‘On the day when I act,’ says God, Master of Legions,, ‘they will be my treasured possession. I will spare them, just as a father has compassion and spares his son who serves him.  And you will again see the distinction between the righteous and the wicked, between those who serve the Lord and those who do not’ (Malachi 3:16-18).”

Malachi well understands our fears and frustrations. He urges us to accept God’s promise of assurance and protection. He wants us to remember that each word of complaint we speak leaves a permanent Mark on our soul. He urges us to fear God, not His wrath, but rather to be in awe of Him, and hold on to His promise of protection just as did the Children of Israel when they risked their lives and took the animal worshiped as a god by the Egyptians and tied them up in front of their homes, provoking their former masters, and saying, “We fear God, not you.”

When the people returned from Babylon to Jerusalem they were still frightened of the military powers who threatened their existence in their new home. They did not fear God as much as they feared men. They cried out against God, rather than to Him, in rejection and anger, rather than connection. They were unchanged despite experiencing redemption. Their complaints were no different from those in King David’s time, and those to whom Isaiah spoke. Their words were the same even after experiencing Redemption. This is our challenge on Pesach- “Peh Sach,” a mouth that converses; has our vocabulary and speech changed because of our positive experiences? (Please see our special series on TheFoundationStone.org: Nisan-Perfecting Our Speech, and Nisan-Fighting The Fire of Anger)

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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30
Mar

The Silversmith-Haftarah Shabbat HaGadol

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Portion of the Week

The verse in Malachi immediately preceding the beginning of this week’s Haftarah reads, “But who can endure the day of His coming? And who can stand when He appears? For He is like a refiner’s fire and like launderer’s soap. He will sit as a refiner and a purifier of silver; He will purify the sons of Levi, and purge them as gold and silver, that they may offer to God and offering in righteousness and (Malachi 3:2–3).”

A man wanted to learn more about the process of refining silver to better understand these verses. He went to a silversmith and made an appointment to watch him at work. As he watched the silversmith, he held a piece of silver over the fire and let it heat up.

He explained that in refining silver, one needed to hold the silver in the middle of the fire where the flames were hottest to burn away all the impurities. The man reflected on God holding us in such a hotspot. He thought again about the verse, that God sits as a refiner and purifier of silver.

He asked the silversmith if it were true that he had to sit there in front of the fire the whole time the silver was being refined. The man answered that yes, he not only had to sit there holding the silver, but he had to keep his eyes on the silver the entire time it was in the fire. if this silver were left even a moment too long in the flames, it would be destroyed.

The man was silent for a moment, then asked the silversmith, “How do you know when the silver is fully refined?”

He smiled and answered, “Oh, that’s easy; when I see my image in it.”

When we speak of God as the Refiner, although we may remember that the refiner holds the silver in the hottest spot, He keeps His eyes on that which is precious every moment to prevent it from being damaged, and He holds it carefully He can see until His own image in it; in us.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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28
Mar

Learning Hope

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays

“Hope is related to the very feeling that life has meaning, and as long as it does, we have reason to live.” (Vaclav Havel)

When the rabbis teach that Egypt had an iron wall from which no person ever escaped they are telling us that the slaves in Egypt lived with absolutely no hope of a future; not for themselves, not for their children, not for any generation; they will forever be without hope.

It was in this way that they suffered more than anyone in history. Because even Holocaust victims and survivors who lived not having hope for themselves, or their children, always believed that eventually there would be salvation; the Jews would be saved.

Rav Chaim Shmuelevitz shared a story that despite the many times he had repeated it caused sobbing tears. He met a survivor of  Aushwitz, whom he asked to describe some of his experiences and was shocked to hear details of this horrible suffering that despite his familiarity with so many Holocaust stories seemed to have a unique nightmarish quality.

He couldn’t help himself; he had to ask the man, “how did you maintain your faith? How did you continue to have a relationship with God?”

The man looked at him and he said, “Rebbenyu, the blessing of the New Moon – Kiddush Levana.”

The rabbi looked at him with a blank stare; ” the blessing of the New Moon?”

“Of course,” said the man.   “I don’t understand,” said the rabbi, and the man explained:

When we recite the blessing of the new moon we speak of a time when the world and the Jewish people will be renewed just as the moon is renewed. Each time I made the declaration I had hope. I knew that it could happen at any moment. I knew that salvation was at hand, and I knew that I needed to hold on desperately to God so that when that moment arrives I would be ready to leap into my new life.

Hope is the one thing that changed dramatically with the exodus of Egypt.

We learned that there is no such thing as having no hope at all for the future. This is what we celebrate and acknowledge when we recite the first paragraph of the answer in the Haggadah; Avadim Hayeinu.

P.S. Rav Chaim’s wife pointed out that most of us don’t pray on Yom Kippur with the intensity with which this man said Kiddush Levana, and that’s a reason to weep!

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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28
Mar

There Is A School in Monsey II

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Reflections & Observations

I once posted an article, “There is a school in Monsey,” describing the great achievements, awareness, sensitivity and Chesed of Ateres Bais Yaakov in Monsey, NY. They’ve done it again:

While thinking of a nice winter vacation, most of us would come up with destinations such as Florida, or any other sunny place on the globe.

Many of my Ateres eleventh grade students thought differently. They decided to embark on a journey to Ukraine, on a trip organized by the school.

The temperatures dropped to -25F, but they were able to bring warmth to others while gaining tremendous inspiration.

One group of students went to Kiev on a Kiruv mission, where they gave over lessons and led activities at the Orach Chaim School.

Another group headed to Odessa, where for ten days, they slept, ate and lived in the Tikva girls’ orphanage. They witnessed the unfathomable poverty and misery these children come from, and experienced the incredible physical and emotional care that Tikva provides for 250 Jewish children in Ukraine. Overnight, my students became teachers, friends and “Mommies”; they nurtured, they bonded, they danced and sung and played with, they tucked little children into bed and said Shema with them. They forged lasting friendships, they gave and taught and brought smiles on these orphans’ faces.

The Ateres eleventh graders came back transformed. They were inspired beyond words. And they haven’t stopped since. They have tirelessly worked at raising  funds  to enable Tikva to continue doing its incredible work. They organized a fundraiser, produced a video, spoke at different events about what they experienced on their trip to Odessa, they held a bake sale, a raffle, a clothing drive and sent food packages.

To quote one of my students: “These children became my siblings, they are my second family. The feeling of love I experienced is a feeling beyond this world. And they need our help. So many more orphans are still on  the streets of Odessa. Without Tikva, these children are lost Jewish souls. Every single one of them should be given the chance to grow up in a happy, healthy environment. They are the future of the Jewish people. The Hebrew word ‘Tikva’ means hope. That is exactly what the Tikva organization gives to those children.”

With hope, and best wishes for a Chag Kasher V’Sameach,

Sarah Salvay,

Eleventh Grade Mechaneches,

Ateres Bais Yaakov

To learn more about Tikva, you can visit www.tikvaodessa.org

Checks can be made out to Tikva corp. and mailed to Tikva c/o Salvay, 11 Pasadena Pl. Spring Valley, NY, 10977

(Tax ID # 223 779 212)

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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16
Mar

A Hidden Responsum

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Music of Halacha

The 20th of Adar is the Yahrtzeit of Rav Yoel (ben Shmuel) Sirkes of Cracow, (the Bach) (1561-1641), author of Bayis Chadash on the Tur, in which he traced each law to its source in the gemarah. In his youth, he studied under Rav Shlomo Leibush of Lublin and Rav Meshulam Feivush in Brisk. He had several rabbinic appointments throughout Poland, lastly as Chief Rabbi of Cracow in 1619. He was the teacher and father-in-law of Rav Dovid HaLevy, the Taz.

In 1979, Rabbi Elijah Schochet told me about the following Responsum, which he wrote up in, “A Responsum of Surrender.” I no longer have the book, but here is the question:

Teshuvah #43-Censored and removed from second edition of Responsa of the Bayit Chadash:

This concerns the false accusations leveled against the city of Kalish against a Jew who was arrested in the matter regarding the theft of their savior. As he was being led away he handed over his bag to others, among them his father-in-law and brother-in-law, who were standing in a large crowd of non-Jews.

After this Jew had suffered martyrdom his libelers leveled a charge against the community claiming that the father-in-law who was the Shamash of the community had taken the bag from the prisoner’s hand and the “savior” was inside.

The officials of the Royal Court handed down the verdict that the elders of the Jewish community were responsible for surrendering the Shamash to stand trial before the Wojewoda. Should they not turn him over to authorities, it would be they who would suffer the punishments intended for him meted out by the Royal Court.

In the interim, the Shamash escaped and is being hidden by friends.

There is reason to fear that if, God forbid, he were to be forced to stand trial before them, he would be tortured in ways beyonds their own established practices.

This is evident from the decree which they have issued against the Community, for according to their own rules and regulations, there is no reason for the community to be held responsible.

Since, as we have observed, they do as they please with us, contrary to their own rules, it is a matter of life and death should he be forced to stand trial.

What is the ruling regarding this man? Is it or is it not permissible to surrender him to stand trial?

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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13
Mar

Impurity in the Relationship

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Portion of the Week

This week’s Haftarah begins, “Again the word of God came to me: ‘Son of man, the house of Israel are living in their own land, they defile it by their conduct and their actions. Their conduct was as the impurity of a menstruous woman in my sight’ (Ezekiel 36:16-17).” The Radak explains: The impurity of a menstruous woman is temporary; it lasts until her period ends and she goes to the Mikvah, hinting that the impurity of the House of Israel is temporary, and can be purified. The metaphor hints that God will eventually restore His relationship with the House of Israel just as a husband returns to his wife when she is purified.

This is one of those times when I read a verse and can recite the morning blessing, “Who did not make me a woman,” with extra intention! What a horrible message to send to women! Is a woman to feel that her period with its separation is similar to Israel in exile because of their sins?

A woman doesn’t have a choice whether to menstruate. The impurity happens to her. Is God implying to Ezekiel that the House of Israel is the victim of its impurity? The metaphor hints that the conduct of the House of Israel happened to them as a period happens to a woman!

The tense also implies that this impurity is endemic to whenever the House of Israel dwells in their own land; Ezekiel is addressing the exiles who are living in Babylon, outside of Israel, and yet he says, “The House of Israel are living in their own land, they defile it,” in the present tense.

I suggest that the “impurity” is not that of the actual period, and that the “menstruating woman” is not a woman who is having her period, but a woman who is still in the stage of life when she has a regular period:

Imagine a couple who are having the most intense physical and emotional intimacy of their lives for two weeks. They are experiencing the deepest connection to each other and feel unified as never before. They both know that, as wonderful as these two weeks are, the woman will soon have her period, and the physical intimacy will be temporarily suspended. They want the emotional intimacy to continue, but they wonder whether it will last despite their physical separation. The “period” with its distance is present in their minds even as they are so connected. The question, “Will it last?” is a constant, even when all is well. There is a hint of “impurity,” or separation, even in their deep connection.

Is our relationship with God any different? Do we not wonder “Will it last?” even in our moments of deepest connection with God? Is there not a constant hint of separation even when we are attached to God?

Even when the “the house of Israel are living in their own land,” we know that we can lose our land, and question the consistency of our relationship with God. The question introduces a hint of separation into our, “conduct and their actions.” That is the impurity God is describing to Ezekiel.

[Consider the Golden Calf, for which the Red Heifer is brought as an atonement, and how the Children of Israel needed physical intimacy with God.]

[Consider the metaphor of why an impure person may not enter the Tabernacle grounds: someone who lives with the question, “How long will it last?” may not enter the place of deepest physical intimacy with God.]

There is a challenge in this metaphor of rebuke: “You are in exile. You are separated from God’s House and land. If you experience the distance as damaging the relationship; that without physical intimacy you cannot have emotional connection, you are not ready to return to the land! You may return, but you will still relate to Me with that seed of “impurity” and separation, wondering how long all this will last.”

“However, if you connect with Me despite the physical separation, you will learn to experience physical intimacy with Me, living in My land, coming to My house, without doubt, insecurity, a seed of impurity.”

This is the only way that Ezekiel can introduce his revolutionary approach in this, the Haftarah of Parah…

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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13
Mar

“Measure Twice Cut Once” by Prof Gerald August

by developer in Portion of the Week, Reflections & Observations

Did the Torah get it wrong the first time it listed what to make in the tabernacle? Why do we need a repetition of the same specifications? This is a duplication of the same excruciating details. What’s the point? The Torah could have used that space to state the 39 things you are prohibited to do on Shabbos. Or, it could have provided more detail on ritual slaughter.

Also, the tabernacle was to be a temporary central point for the Jewish people until they could build the Temple. This information might be of interest to archaeological architects, but who could find any meaning that is relevant to us today?

I think there are two relevant lessons in this wallowing in specificity and repetition.

The first relevant point is that the specifications are repeated. When we take time to proofread, go back and check again, we insure that what we thought the first time was correct..

In our fast paced, new-media society how many people take the time to make sure that what they’re sending is what they want to send, and whether what they’re sending will blow back on them because it was not correct or just plain offensive.

When there was no Internet, and people wrote letters and notes to each other, there was a simple rule, the 24-hour test. Put it in a drawer and look at it the next day. You may find that the strong emotions you expressed were not appropriate or you didn’t have all the facts, so you didn’t send the letter. Remember e-mail is there forever. So the first lesson is to take your time and think about what you’re communicating. Don’t get yourself into trouble.

The second thing we learn is to be specific. When we leave out important details, the recipient does not know what to do. Many times we talk in generalities or not adequate detail, when what is needed are the specifics. The specifics had better be correct or the edifice crumbles down

I was visiting a relative in a hospital. The facility was on 80 acres and was relatively new, about 10 years old. One of the other visitors looked at me and said they made a big mistake when they built the hospital. I asked what it was. She asked me where the closets were? I pointed to the armoire. She told me there were no closets in the hospital. Someone forgot to put them in the blueprints. That is someone that should have measured twice, going over the specs with a fine tooth comb. That would have prevented such an egregious oversight.

We learn a lesson about specificity from the Torah. You need to have all the specifics. Leaving out one can be disastrous. Measure twice, cut once.

So rather than being a waste of parchment in the Torah, we learn two critical life lessons from these readings. No wonder so much space was given to them..

This post is in memory of my mother, whose yartzeit is this coming week.

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11
Mar

Four Songs of the Four Portions

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Portion of the Week

There is one who sings the song of his own life, and in himself he finds everything, his full spiritual satisfaction.

There is another who sings the song of his people. He leaves the circle of his own individual self, because he finds it without sufficient breadth, without an idealistic basis. He aspires toward the heights, and he attaches himself with a gentle love to the whole community of Israel. Together with her he sings her songs. He feels grieved in her afflictions and delights in her hopes. He contemplates noble and pure thoughts about her past and her future, and probes with love and wisdom her inner spiritual essence.

There is another who reaches toward more distant realms, and he goes beyond the boundary of Israel to sing the song of man. His spirit extends to the wider vistas of the Majesty of man generally, and his noble essence. He aspires toward man’s general goal and looks forward toward his higher perfection. From this source of life he draws the subjects of his meditation and study, his aspirations and his visions.

Then there is one who rises toward wider horizons, until he links himself with all existence, with all God’s creatures, with all worlds, and he sings his song with all of them. It is of one such as this that tradition has said that whoever sings a portion of song each day is assured of having a share in the World to Come.

And then there is one who rises with all the songs in one ensemble, and they all joined their voices. Together they sing their songs with beauty, each one lends vitality and life to the other. They are sounds of joy and gladness, sounds of jubilation in celebration, sounds of ecstasy and holiness.

The song of the self, the song of the people, the song of man, the song of the world all merge in him at all times, in every hour.

This full comprehensiveness rises to become the song of holiness, the song of God, the son of Israel, in its full strength and beauty, in its full authenticity and greatness. The name “Israel” stands for Shir el, the song of God. It is a simple song, a twofold song, a threefold song, and a fourfold song. It is the Song of Songs of Solomon, Shlomo, which means peace or wholeness. It is the song of the King in Whom is wholeness. (Orot Kedushah, II, Pages 458-459)

I believe that these Four Songs are represented by the Four Portions: Shekalim, Zachor, Parah, and HaChodesh, culminating in the Song of Songs of Pesach. Can you see how each portion expresses a different song?

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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8
Mar

Tolstoy and the Golden Calf Part Three

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Portion of the Week

“Before Yeravam ben Nevat, the people of Israel nursed from a single calf. Thereafter, they nursed from three; the one of the Golden Calf and the two of Yeravam (Sanhedrin 102a).”

How could the person about whom the Talmud says, “The Torah knowledge of Yeravam was flawless (Sanhedrin 102a),” and that “the entire Torah was an open field to him, and he discovered new insights that no ear had ever heard (ibid.),” introduce such a idol worship to the people?

“He seated a wicked man beside a righteous man and asked them, ‘ Will you sign to everything I do?’

‘ Yes,’ they replied.

‘ I would like to be king over you,’ he said.

‘ Very well,’ they replied.

‘ Will you fulfill all that I command you?’

‘ Yes,’ they replied.

‘ Even if it be to worship idols?’

‘ Heaven forbid,’ said the righteous people.

The wicked men said to the righteous men, ‘ Do you think a man like Yeravam would worship idols? He merely wishes to test you and see if you will obey him.’

Even Achiah haShiloni erred and signed (Sanhedrin 101b).” There is danger in allowing a single person to hold such unlimited power. This was Yeravam’s argument.

This was his argument with King Solomon.

This was his fear of Jerusalem: “If this people goes up to offer sacrifices (I Kings 12:27).” Yeravam said, “It is a tradition that no one may sit in the inner courtyard of the Temple except for the kings of the House of Judah. When they see Rechavam sitting while I stand, they will think, ‘ This one is the true king; that one, the slave.’ If I too sit, I will be in rebellion against the kingdom. Then they will slay me and follow Rechavam.”

The people insist on breaking away from the House of Judah and yet they acknowledge that only a descendant of that House may sit in the inner courtyard of the Temple. The people who are insisting on breaking away into a separate kingdom, will perceive anyone else who sits in that place as rebelling against the kingdom! Even the people who are rejecting the King will still honor him! They do not know what they really want. There is nothing more dangerous than having a single human being with unlimited power “Tolstoy and the Golden Calf-Part Two”) leading people who are unsure of what they want; “Tolstoy and the Golden Calf”. Such a person is always in danger of becoming a Golden Calf himself.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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