August, 2010 Archives

30
Aug

Rosh Hashana Joy

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Spiritual Growth

Smile!

Smile!

“This day is holy to God your Lord. Don’t mourn, nor weep.” For all the people wept, when they heard the words of the law. Then he said to them, “Go your way. Eat the fat, drink the sweet, and send portions to him for whom nothing is prepared; for this day is holy to our Lord. Don’t be grieved; for the joy of God is your strength.” (Nehemiah 8:8-10)

Joy and happiness is the root of all healing. (Rabbeinu Yonah, Commentary to Proverbs 17:22)

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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30
Aug

An Appreciation of Kindred Souls

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Reflections & Observations

I teach and study with people in Israel, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Australia, Monsey, Passaic, Brooklyn, Monroe, Tribeca, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and St. Louis. Most are not the most learned people. They would not be the normative superstars in Yeshiva or Beit Yaakov. But there are no other people with whom I would rather stand before the Ultimate Judge on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. They are all real human beings, struggling to master themselves, and searching for meaning in everything they do.

My friend and teacher, Rabbi Chaim Goldberger, also a rabbi of many such people, met some of these students, and was moved to remark how fortunate I am to have such people in my life. He is convinced that they represent the magnificence of Judaism.

Last night, while teaching prayer, my students took a basic idea I presented and flew with it. I sat back and listened to them expand an idea until it literally touched the Heavens. I was granted the gift to see my students taste eternal life in this world. When a father circumcises his son, he intends to do whatever he can to help his child live as a Ben Olam Habah, a person who lives with a sense of eternity. Over the past few weeks, God has gifted me with the realization that many of my students, children, according to the Torah, have become exactly that.

I realized that I can look forward to standing before God in total humility and gratitude for allowing me to have such wonderful people as part of my life. I also look forward to standing before God as one of such a group of incredible human beings. I am a fortunate man.

I thank God for the gift, and I thank them for being part of my life.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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30
Aug

Royal Messages 100 and One

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

“One cannot compare someone who has reviewed his studies one hundred times to someone who has reviewed them one hundred and one.” (Chagigah)

Rabbi Yechezkail Levenstein zt”l explained that the latter is not someone who simply reviewed his studies one extra time. It describes someone who focused on “Achat” – the One -, as he studied.

We live with enhanced awareness of God on Rosh Hashana. We can take that awareness and add it to our studies, so that whenever we learn we remember “Achat” – The One.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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30
Aug
29
Aug

Rosh Hashanah Prayers: Hashem Melech

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Reflections & Observations

“God is King. God was King. God will be King forever.” Once I heard Rabbi Zweig’s lecture on the Portion of the Week for the first time, I decided that I would make him my Rebbi.

The next morning I was waiting outside his home to walk him to Yeshiva. I had a list of questions ready. “What are you doing here so early.” he asked. “I have some questions,” I said, and began to ask. I immediately wrote down all his answers, and by the time he walked home for lunch, I had more questions ready, including some on his morning answers.

I waited outside his house until he was ready to return to Yeshiva. I used the time to write down his answers and prepare more questions.

This went on for more than two weeks until he felt obligated to invite me in to his home. His wife did not appreciate my incessant questions during the meals so we negotiated regular meals in exchange for some quiet time.

All this time, I was working at making Rabbi Zweig my Rebbi, but he was not yet.

It was two months later as we were learning in his study at 2am, when I came up with a “Rabbi Zweig” answer on my own, that he became my Rebbi. Our relationship changed.

What was interesting was that my long list of questions and his answers were no longer a record of my challenge to him, they became more precious as a record of my Rebbi’s teachings. Our new relationship changed the past.

People often ask about the order of the key verse of Hashem Melech; should it not begin with God was King, then move to the present and then the future? Why.does it begin in the current then switch to the past and then leap to the future?

Our Rosh Hashanah experience of God as King, can change the past. We look back through the lens of this new awareness of God Is King and see His Royal Hand in the past.

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Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Aug

Dead Rock Stars by Reb Sam Glaser

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Reflections & Observations, Spiritual Growth

I am thrilled to offer another superb essay by my dear friend, true Ba’al Tefillah, Reb Sam Glaser, with important reflections appropriate to this time of Teshuva:

One thing we share as human beings is a deep, unspoken connection to our past.  Intense events that stick to our psyches like a thistle in a ball of cotton.  Some of those moments create potholes in our lives that we vow to avoid in the future at all costs.  Others create cravings that we still try to satisfy.  Single frames of the movie of our lives create our personality, our predilections, our phobias.

I recently saw the movie KPAX where Kevin Spacey’s character is tormented by a terrible episode in his past and convincingly adopts the character of an alien to cope with the trauma.  I have friends who have been raped and even decades later must deal with the resulting anger and lack of feelings of security. Kids who suffer abuse must work overtime as adults to prevent the destructive chain from continuing into their own children’s lives.  There’s a window of time when we are so vulnerable.  It’s that same timeframe when we are more open and available to learning core modalities like taking on a new languages and musical instruments.  I have six cousins who lost their father when they were kids.  The destruction that this event wreaked upon their lives was commensurate with how old they were when it occurred.  Those too young or old enough to wrap their heads around the tragedy escaped the degree of damage that their other siblings had to endure.

At a seminar I attended I was challenged to recall an incident during my teen years that scarred me and created a force that would inform my lifelong choices.  An incident where perhaps I realized I was not “good enough.” A few came to mind.  As an insecure tenth grader, my first year in high school, I nervously approached the door to the music room where the madrigal audition callbacks were posted.  My name was not on the list.  After three years as the star of the choir in Jr. High, the winner of the best vocalist in the LA City School district, this outcome was not acceptable.  Singers were my chevra.  My homies. My only reference group.  As I endured a lonely tenth grade year I silently vowed that this would never happen again, that I would never rest on my laurels and my musical abilities would always be in peak form.

During my freshman year at CU Boulder I played keyboards in a Heavy Metal band called Castlerock.  We played college parties and prided ourselves in our long hair and intense volume.  One night, our guitarist Muno Wahab informed me that the song we had just perfected, Tommy Bolin’s “Post Toastee,” in all it’s nine minute glory, was written just before Tommy died at 25 of a drug overdose.  I had just been exposed to his two albums and was hoping to see him play live.  Add Tommy to The List:  that dead rock star list that already boasted Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison and Jim Croce, Janis and Mama, Buddy and Bonham.  Bolin had only begun his solo career.   He played with Deep Purple, Billy Cobham and Jeff Beck, a crazy talented, innovative guitarist and songwriter.  He was a Boulder, CO local.  And now he was gone, all that talent and passion now six feet under.

That night I think I appreciated the vulnerability of my creative output for the first time.  I had already written hundreds of songs, knowing that someday I’d have a chance to record them for the world to hear.  As an overworked double major and cash starved college kid, it wasn’t in the cards for a while, especially given that back then there was no such thing as Apple’s Garage Band.  You either had the money for a 24 track pro studio or you kept your music to yourself.  But what if I died in the meantime?  All those musical ideas gone with the wind!  Thus was born the drive to record at all costs, even if it meant plunging all my money into building my own studio and learning the craft.

By the time I finished college I accumulated a respectable pile of recording gear.  My best acquisitions were made helping starving musician friends get quick cash when all they had to sell was their instruments.  I built a studio in my dad’s downtown LA fabric warehouse and purchased a Mac.  That’s the original 512k Mac and the first version of MOTU Performer, the same hardware and software companies that keep my music playin’ till this day.  I got good enough recording my own music and started producing others, creating a business that allows me to make people’s musical dreams come true and to sneak in an album of my own every year.  Yes, I love touring and performing, touching my audiences with spiritual, uplifting music.  But I must confess that my global galavanting is primarily a vehicle for me to find a home for these songs that I exorcise from my dream state every few days.

We are so busy climbing our personal mountains that we forget how they got built in the first place.  My Letter in the Torah song comes to mind: “Who am I anyway, where am I going to, how did I get here and what do I need to know?” Our biblical heroes shared a common profession.  They were all shepherds!  I can just imagine sending around a resume with “shepherd” in the work experience section. But shepherds have time to think.

Abraham used the time to intuit the existence of an ethical, loving God.  Moses learned to care for a flock and wasn’t too busy to investigate a certain burning bush.

Taking time to think can be frightening.  Is this the best job choice, relationship, use of my time? What if the answer is no?  What if some negative experience in your past thrust you into action and only now you stop to realize that your present reality was dictated by some bully who called you a name in grade school?  Making changes is hard work.  But not making changes is either pathetic or tortuous. What were you born to do? Where would you be if that “seismic event” hadn’t happened to set you on your current trajectory?  Who convinced you that you must have an MBA or law degree?  Why do you live where you do?  How will you meet your predestined one if you are dating someone just to have company?

“What you are is God’s gift to you. What you make of yourself is your gift to God.” -Kelly Jeppesen

I was recently in a Starbucks taking a moment to breathe.  I had finished multiple errands and I gave myself permission to think. As I sipped my mocha I engaged in a Breslov ritual of dwelling on all the things I was grateful for.  My life, my health, my family, my home, my music, this delicious cup of coffee.  I started up a conversation with a guy next to me who turns out to be the same age from the same neighborhood.  He’s a healthcare executive who just got laid off.  It’s a lousy time to get laid off. He shared that he used his newly found free time to build homes in Alabama for Habitat For Humanity and had a great experience.  His newly realized goal is to use his business skills to create a similar company in the non-profit sector where he can make a difference.

Thanks to dead rock stars I now have more albums out than The Beatles.  Thanks to NOT getting into madrigals my freshman year in high school I learned to take my craft more seriously.  I also became more humble and able to roll with the changes.  God gives us tests to make us stronger, and only offers us challenges that we can handle.  Sometimes God sends events that force us to awaken to new opportunities.  The Jewish calendar gives us periods like the Three Weeksof decreased joy (but still joy nonetheless), followed by Elul, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, so that we introspect, appreciate our gifts and perceive what we’re missing.  Consider taking this season to tap into those formative moments in your life that shaped the person you are today.  If the shoe fits, wear it.  And if not…

Sam Glaser (samglaser.com) is a popular composer, performer and writer in Los Angeles. He tours to over 50 cities annually in concert and has been named one of the top ten Jewish musicians in the US by Moment Magazine.

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29
Aug

Meloch Al Kol HaOlam Kulo: Heaven & Earth

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

This picture of Pena, Portugal reminds me of how I often picture God’s Palace, high above the earth. Yet, our prayers speak, not of the glory of the heavens, but of God’s Presence here on earth:

“Reign over the entire universe in Your glory; be exalted over all the world in Your splendor, reveal Yourself in the majestic grandeur of Your strength over all the dwellers of Your inhabited world. Let everything that has been made know that You are its Maker, and let everything with life’s breath in its nostrils proclaim, ‘God, the Lord of Israel, is King, and His Kingship rules over everything.”

Our heads should not be in the clouds on Rosh Hashanah. Our job is not to declare God as King in the Heavens, but here on earth; “Your inhabited world.” Rosh Hashanah is our opportunity to create Heaven on Earth.

When we set our goals for the coming year in the Heavens, striving to live as the holy and righteous, we are attempting to reach that palace on the mountain top. We will lose everything we gained immediately upon returning to earth; our daily lives.

We must focus our goals for the coming year for “Your inhabited world,” right here, practical and accessible.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Aug

Needing God: Na’aman VI

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Prayer, Spiritual Growth

‘So Naaman returned to the man of G-d’ and it doesn’t even mention Elisha by name, ‘man of G-d’, because its not Elisha the person, it is whom Elisha and what he represents. Naaman in his entire production; ‘he came and stood before the navi and said behold, now I know that there is no G-d in the whole world except in Israel.’

Can you imagine? He doesn’t focus on Elisha, he understands this is G-d. ‘And now please accept a tribute from your servant.

But Elisha answered by the life of Hashem before whom I have stood I will not accept.’ Naaman imposed upon Elisha to accept, but Elisha refused. Why? Because Elisha is a vehicle. He can’t accept anything, it has nothing to do with him, it is G-d and he cannot take away from that at all.

So despite the fact that Naaman understands this to a degree because his response is now I know there is no G-d other than the G-d of Israel. But still Naaman does feel this special connection to Elisha.

And we do this. Whether it is a chassid with a rebbe, or whether it is a student with a rebbe, there are times we fall into the trap of identifying our growth with this one human being. Instead of understanding that that human being is a vehicle and only a vehicle and that the relationship is a relationship with Hashem. And anything, even giving a small gift to Elisha is a distraction from what Hashem did for Naaman. Any time we focus on the teacher, the rebbe, or the Chassidic rebbe, the tzadik, the mekubal it’s a distraction from our relationship with G-d. It’s a lack of awareness that any one of us can have that direct relationship with G-d. We do not need that person in between. And as much clarity as Naaman has that there is no G-d other than the G-d of Israel, he is still distracted by Elisha, please accept a gift. Look what you did for me. And Elisha is saying, I didn’t do anything for you, Hashem did.

So Naaman says may there at least be given to your servant two mule loads of earth for your servant will never again offer a burnt offering or a peace offering to other gods only to Hashem and may Hashem forgive your servant, forgive me Naaman, for this matter, when my master the king’s king comes to the temple of Rimon To prostrate himself there he leans on my arm. So I must bow in the temple of Rimon. May Hashem forgive your servant for this thing. So I will be holding my master, he bows down. So I will be bowing down as I am holding him, but I am not really bowing down to rimon. But if I don’t do it, he will kill me.

Interesting thing. He acknowledges that there is no god other than the G-d of Israel, and he will not worship idols, but he will not convert, he will not stop serving the king of Aram and he won’t risk his life. He will continue to take his master to the temple of Rimon, the idol, to worship there, and he is not willing to risk his life.

And from here we derive a halacha that a non-Jew is not obligated to give up his life for not to serve avoda zara. And Elisha said to him, ‘go to peace’ and then Naaman travelled the stretch of land from where he began to go away. Elisha is happy. He doesn’t say to Naaman, look what happened to you, you should be converting and you should go to yeshiva, go to Aish for 2 years and then get semicha and then become an Aish rabbi and open up a branch in Aram or in Damascus. He doesn’t say to him, you have to do teshuva and never walk in to ?? of idol worship again. He says to Naaman, what you are doing is fine. Go to peace, find peace in what you are doing. He doesn’t make all sorts of demands.

Ok, so we have the basic lessons. We have listening to when G-d sends us a wake up call and when you send raiding parties and you only get one, G-d is sending a wake up call. You have the message in the simplicity of the girl. You have how to present teffilah to Hashem, the way Naaman presented his case to the king. You have Yehoran self-destruct and the parallels with our own sense of inadequacy or distance in the relationship with Hashem. We have the message of Naaman’s frustration with Elisha’s greeting and Elisha’s instructions, wanting it to be so much more complicated because we like complicated. And we have Naaman’s acknowledgment of G-d, but still that sense of I need Elisha – and he doesn’t. And then we have Naaman accepting and responding with limitation and Elisha being perfectly ok. Of course, yeh I should believe in G-d and I should be perfect and G-d should play a role and absolutely everything, but Elisha is satisfied with Naaman’s response. All of these are important lessons to prepare for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Aug

Comfortable Speaking With God: Na’aman IV

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Spiritual Growth

So Naaman brought to the king of Israel, the letter which said, ‘and now when this letter comes to you, behold I have sent my servant Naaman to you that you shall heal him from his tzoraas.’ Isn’t there something missing from that letter?

The prophet.

What happened to the prophet? But the king is obviously, intentionally, avoiding any mention of the prophet. This is between king and king. And what message is he sending to Yehoram, to the king of Israel, you are responsible. You handle it any way you want, but you are responsible. Now let’s figure it out over here. Why wouldn’t he mention the prophet?

Why wouldn’t he?

Well what does the king of Aram expect Yehoram to do?

To find the best solution.

Which would obviously be what?

The prophet.

The prophet. But remember someone had a question before about this idea of the prophet. What’s the only way they know about this prophet?

Through the girl.

So he is not going to write a letter to another king based on what a little girl said. So he is saying, you know what, if the king of Israel really has this prophet, I would imagine that the king of Israel is using this prophet. That logical isn’t it, if the king of Israel has someone with so much power, he has got to be crazy not to be using this person with power. So let him take care of it, and if this prophet really exists he’ll take care of it, and if he doesn’t exist I’ll have an excuse to smash him in battle. So the king reads the letter and when Yehoram, the king of Israel, read the letter what does he do? He doesn’t say oh no, call Elisha we have an emergency, where is the hotline to G-d. we need him. What does he do? He tears his clothes and he says am I G-d that I can go and give life, that this person sends to me to heal a man of his tzoraas. Go now and see he is seeking a pretext against me. He wants war.

So a little girl knows about the prophet and it doesn’t even occur to the king to think about the prophet. Woah. It doesn’t even occur to him, and he is so angry what does he do? He tears his clothes. Now you picture yourself, you are the chief of staff of the army of Aram, you come into the king of Israel, you hand him a letter, you know about the prophet, the king opens the letter, reads it and tears his clothes, he is freaking out. What do you think about this man? If he is so angry that he is tearing his clothes, what do you think about this man?

That he is not going to be a very good enemy, he’ll be too ??

This guy is nuts. He’s wacko. A little girl thinks about the prophet and the king doesn’t? woah man, what is going on. No wonder this guy is losing all his battles, he cant think straight. And why doesn’t the king think about it? Why would he hesitate to think about the Navi? Because what is the price of his calling Elisha on the hotline?

He had to listen to Elisha about everything.

You mean if Elisha comes through for him here then he is going to have to start listening to Elisha. Does he want to start listening to Elisha?

No.

But of course none of us ever do that. Right? We never play this game with G-d. Do we?

No. never.

Ok. Good. So as long as we agree on that too then we are fine. But I suspect that some of us do. That when we need help from G-d and only G-d can come through for us or we are overwhelmed so we feel we need a super power, so, we call G-d. but sometimes we hesitate because we feel inadequate or sometimes we hesitate because we say, well, I’m not as good as I should be, I don’t daven as much as I should, I don’t learn as much as I should. I’m not as careful as I should be. And so there are times when we are hesitant in davening before G-d because we feel almost as if we are undeserving.

So here is king he is self-destruct. I mean he is ripping his clothes, what better indication of self destruct do you need that that? Because this is a king who has created a situation for himself, his only solution is the navi, everyone knows about the navi. And his only solution is the navi, but he has created a situation in which he is convinced that he can’t access the navi. And we believe this. So Rabbeinu Menachem Hameiri in his commentary to the gemarah says that one of the biggest issues we have in davening is that we feel inadequate. First of all I’m going to bother G-d about my needs and G-d has to take care of the world. He said the bigger issue of inadequacy is we’re embarrassed. How can I come to G-d now and ask G-d for help when I haven’t been doing everything the way I should be doing it. Or I haven’t been doing it as well as I should be doing it. The Meiri says that’s the biggest mistake a human being can make. G-d is G-d, there is no pestering, there is no issue that is too insignificant for G-d, G-d cares about everything and everyone. And there is no such thing as having reached the stage at which G-d says you have no right to daven. And somebody who reaches a stage, or they have created an environment around themselves in which they feel uncomfortable speaking to G-d because of the weakness in their relationship with Hashem is self-destructing in the same way that Yehoram was self-destructing when he was tearing his clothes. And the Navi knows this.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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29
Aug

Tikkunim VIII – Solutions

by Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in Holidays, Spiritual Growth

It may be that Elul is a time of Tikkun, but many of us feel overwhelmed by how much we have to repair, and the magnitude of some of the issues we want to address. We begin in a state of weakness. The Talmud speaks of Tikkun as, not only repair, but how to affect that fixing:

R. Eleazar said; The illiterate will not be resurrected, for it is said in Scripture, The dead will not live etc. So it was also taught: “The dead will not live.” As this might [be assumed to refer] to all, it was specifically stated, “The lax will not rise,” [thus indicating] that the text speaks only of such a man as was lax in the study of the words of the Torah.

Said R. Johanan to him: it is no satisfaction to their Master that you should speak to them in this manner. That text was written of a man who was so lax as to worship idols. ‘I’, the other replied, ‘make an exposition [to the same effect] from another text. For it is written in Scripture, “For thy dew is as the dew of light, and the earth shall bring to life the dead,” him who makes use of the ‘light’ of the Torah will the ‘light’ of the Torah revive, but him who makes no use of the light of the Torah the light of the Torah will not revive’.

Observing, however, that he was distressed, he said to him, ‘Master, I have found for

them a remedy (Takana) in the Pentateuch: “But you that did cleave unto the Lord your God are alive every one of you this day;” now is it possible to ‘cleave’ to the divine presence concerning which it is written in Scripture, “For the Lord, your God is a devouring fire?”

But [the meaning is this:] Any man who marries his daughter to a scholar, or carries on a trade on behalf of scholars, or benefits scholars from his estate is regarded by Scripture as if he had cleaved to the divine presence.

Similarly you read in Scripture, “To love the Lord your God, [to hearken to His voice,] and to cleave to Him.” Is it possible for a human being to ‘cleave’ unto the divine presence?

But [what was meant is this:] Any man who marries his daughter to a scholar, or carries on a trade for scholars, or benefits scholars from his estate is regarded by Scripture as if he had cleaved to the divine presence. Ketubot 111b

Tikkun also means to develop a strategy as a solution to a problem. This is actually the most demanding of all the forms of Tikkun we have discussed:

If I commit to stop a destructive behavior and repair my life’s path, we are affecting Tikkun as repair. This form of Tikkun demands that we develop strategies that will allow us to keep our commitments and adhere to our Rosh Hashanah resolutions. The commitment to change is only the first step of Tikkun. The higher Tikkun is when we develop strategies that will allow us to accomplish the promised repairs.

It is essential to note that the repair is imperfect! The strategy in the Talmudic selection above was to find a way to fulfill a commandment, when we feel overwhelmed by its highest demands. The strategy was to discover another way to fulfill the Mitzvah.

There are absolute laws about speaking Lishon Harah. When we decide to Repair our sins of Lishon Harah we face a huge problem: How can we fix our speech when it is so easy to fail? If we focus on the Tikkun as perfect speech, we will usually fail before we even begin. The best strategy is to set an achievable goal for my speech.

Author Info:
Learn & discover the Divine prophecies with Rabbi Simcha Weinberg from the holy Torah, Jewish Law, Mysticism, Kabbalah and Jewish Prophecies. The Foundation Stone™ is the ultimate resource for Jews, Judaism, Jewish Education, Jewish Spirituality & the holy Torah.

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